Find Help, Find Hope

Newsletter

NAMI Miami-Dade County E-Newsletter Vol.41 Issue 14

An Slightly Humorous Overview of Stress &
Some Hints for Managing It
By:  Steve Liebowitz, ED.D
Dr. Steve Liebowitz
Stress is when you wake up screaming and you realize you haven’t fallen asleep yet.
Humor is the #1 stress management technique. Try this:
When you feel stressed out, when everyone seems to be leaving you, when the world seems to be fading away into the mist, please let me know: I will take you to the eye specialist for a checkup!
Humor and every other stress management technique work because stress is an individual matter. One person’s excitement may be another person’s stress. What’s stressful to you, may not be stressful to me. Each of us decides what’s stressful to us. That means each of us is in control. Nearly total control. Feeling stress is a decision, a choice. Perhaps an unconscious choice, or a choice made long ago, but a choice, nonetheless. That’s the good news. It means in time with practice we can make a different choice and learn to see our stressors differently.
Allow me to introduce my selves.
There are two kinds of stress: Eustress and Distress. Like good cholesterol and bad cholesterol. (My good cholesterol is so good, its volunteering at the Salvation Army)  Eustress is stress we enjoy, like watching a horror movie. Distress is the kind we don’t enjoy. The body’s response to both kinds of stress is the same. We’ll be focusing on Distress.
A stressor is something we perceive as a threat, that triggers the flight or fight response in our limbic system, the most primitive part of our triune brains – reptilian, mammalian and neo-mammalian – reflecting the stages of evolution. No stressor, no flight or fight response. If I haven’t labeled something a threat, I don’t get the flight or fight response – the release of cortisol into my blood, causing muscles to tighten in preparation to run of fight, and the blood to flow from my stomach to my extremities – that we experience as stress.
Everyone thinks I’m psychotic except my friends deep inside the earth.
That’s where the choice comes in: deciding to label something as a threat/stressor. Could be internal – a thought or a feeling, or external – someone yelling at you, giving you a dirty look or pointing a gun at you. If I’m trained (decided) to stay centered when someone points a gun at me, I haven’t labeled that a threat/stressor, so no flight or fight response and no stress.
The three ways to deal with stress are: Elimination, Resistance and Coping. Each is important, all are necessary and all work best when a stressor is clearly identified. We have a gazillion stressors so this is an ongoing process. It’s best to do the large ones first, tho.
Elimination & Preparation
Just what the words say, eliminate the threat/stressor or prepare for it. If there’s a pebble in your shoe, dump it out. Acceptance and God’s Will have a place, but not here. Be creative. If it’s a biggy, chip away at it, take lot’s of small bites ’till it’s gone. If you know you’re going to have a stressful situation like an interview, prepare for it, visualize it going well.
Resistance
My favorite and most effective. Become stress resistant. This long term strategy entails working with all dimensions of your beingness, your life, more or less simultaneously: Spirit, Mind, Emotions and Physical. Another article would be needed to cover these adequately. However, here are a few examples. For Spirit, prayer and meditation. For Mind, mindfulness and self awareness. For Emotional, self acceptance and no judgment. For Physical, diet and exercise. Doing something in all four dimensions everyday builds stress resistance, stressors aren’t perceived as threats or even perceived at all.
Coping
So you’ve eliminated, you’re building resistance, but some stress arises. Deep breathing, count to ten, let go and let God.
Is it time for your medication or mine?
So, here we are an overview of stress and some hints about managing it. Use them well, live long and prosper!
Dr. Steve is available for one-on-one and group work. Contact him at sliebowitz@aol.com.

PUBLIC OFFICIAL OF THE YEAR
Judge Steven Leifman 2016 Honoree

Miami-Dade College President
Eduardo Padron
Receives Presidential Metal of Freedom

                                    NAMI Miami-Dade County Board
                                                             Meets 
                                            County Commissioners
 
 
J.C. Garrido, Kathy Coppola, Robin Cole, Commissioner Suarez, Susan Racher, Carlos Larrauri
On October 4th, 2016 NAMI Miami-Dade County Board of Directors met with Commissioner Francis Suarez to present an introduction to NAMI and its Programs.

On Sunday October 16th, 2016 NAMI Miami-Dade County Membership and Leaders participated in the “Out of Darkness Community Walk” this Walk was held at The University of Miami at “The Sanford Rock.” The Walk began at 9:00 am to benefit the The American Foundation for Suicide Prevention.
AFSP is the leader in the fight against suicide. They  fund research, create educational programs, advocate for public policy, and support survivors of suicide loss. Led by CEO Robert Gebbia and headquarted in New York, AFSP has local chapters in all 50 states.
Thanks to Walkers and Donors like you, AFSP has been able to set a goal to reduce the annual suicide rate 20% by 2025.
Why We Walk
The Out of the Darkness Walks are proof that when people work together they can make big changes in the world. They are AFSP’s largest fundraiser – they produce millions for suicide prevention programs, unite those who have been affected by suicide, and create communities that are smart about mental health.

“The Fall into Wellness Fair inspires everyone to get healthy, enjoy the great weather outdoors, and support the launch of our annual United Way Campaign,” said Mayor Gimenez.
“I am pleased to host this event to help educate our community members on how they can live healthier, happier lives, and help others do the same.”
During the event, participants were able to adopt a pet from the Miami-Dade County Animal Services Department, learn more about the services available from the Miami-Dade Public Library System, Transportation and Public Works, Regulatory and Economic Resources’,Consumer Protection and Air Quality Management and the Parks, Recreation and Open Spaces Department, as well as many others.
Additionally, there were local Farmers Market Merchants, Food Trucks, Free on-Site Health Screenings for Employees, Live Entertainment and a Harvest-Themed Pumpkin Patch. Nami Miami-Dade County had a Table and Information set up within the Atrium.

              The Miami-Dade Police Department Graduation Ceremony 2016 
The Miami-Dade Police Department held The Graduation Ceremony for several Graduating Officers at the Miami-Dade Public Safety Training Institute on September 28th 2016. NAMI Miami-Dade County works in connection with The Miami-Dade County Crisis Intervention Team and The Eleventh Judicial Circuit Criminal Mental Health Project.
                                                                             

The Miami Foundation’s Give Miami Day set a new fundraising record, solidifying it as one of the most active 24-hour charitable giving events in the U.S. On November 17th, nineteen-thousand donors from around the globe poured $9.1 million into 664 local nonprofits participating in Give Miami Day 2016. Now in its fifth year, the event – held annually on the Thursday before Thanksgiving – has raised more than $25.6 million for local organizations in every nonprofit sector, from arts to housing to science and technology.
“Our community has totally taken ownership of Give Miami Day,” said Javier Alberto Soto, president and CEO of The Miami Foundation. “Everywhere I went on Thursday, the energy was palpable – all of Greater Miami was pumped about giving back and supporting these important organizations. The day’s outstanding results prove the heights Miamians can reach when we band together in support of the place we call home.” NAMI Miami-Dade County participated in “Give Miami Day” and raised over $7000.00. Thank you Miami!
NAMI MDC Board and Volunteers on “Give Miami Day”
NAMI on Campus FIU Students on “Give Miami Day”
                                                                     Link: The Miami Foundation

The NAMI NATIONAL CONVENTION 2017
Will bring the Country’s Keenest Minds and Savviest Policymakers together in Washington DC  to offer Strategies and Tactics to Effectively Advocate for Changing In The Mental Health System in our Nation.

The 2017 Blueberry Horseshoe 5k, at Lambholm South,
Will be an Event to Remember!!
This Exciting, Well Manicured, Multi-Surface, Clearly Marked, & Scenic Course is set on an Estate that’s Steeped in Thoroughbred Champion History. You’ll Run/Walk where Riders & their Steeds from around the World come to compete. Whether it’s the Beauty of the Venue, the Incredible Perks & Prizes, or joining to Support a Cause that’s Dear to your Heart.
This Event is a Must Attend Run/Walk 5k!

                                                            NAMI Florida
                                        Annual Meeting & Conference 2016
University of South Florida, Tampa
Department of Mental Health Law and Policy

2016 Conference was held December 2nd-December 4th

Mental Health Legislation 2017:
Rep. Kathleen Peters, Rep. Gayle Harrell
Senator Jack Latvala
Senator Rene Garcia
Miami-Dade Judge Steve Leifman
Decriminalizing Mental Illness: Criminal Justice and Mental Health
Panel-Judge Steve Leifman, Florida Supreme Court Task Force
Bob Dillinger, Public Defender, 6th Judicial Circuit

Paula Ambroso, Veterans Judicial Outreach Program

Ask The Doctor Segment:
Abbey Strauss, President, Florida Psychiatric Society
Regina Bussing, Chair, University of Florida Dept. of Psychiatry
 

                         Florida Chain
The Florida Chain 2nd Annual Conference Community Health Action Information Network  held a Press Conference on September 27th to release the third regional Health Care Opportunity Report in Orlando at The Harry P. Lew Gardens.
Following the Press Conference
“Moving Forward Together: Advancing HealthCare for Those Left Behind”

This Conference offered opportunity over 100 participants to National Experts, Advocates, Consumers, HealthCare Providers, Policy Makers and other Stakeholders to learn about pressing Health Policy Topics, aquire new skills and network with other participants dedicated to improving the health of Floridians.

Florida Chain is a NAMI Partner.

Link: FloridaChain

 

NAMI Miami-Dade County Vice-President Kathy Coppola along with NAMI Miami Volunteers participated in the
CNC Nurturing Hispanic Communities Wellness Fair 2016.
 
      THE CNC HEALTH, SAFETY AND WELLNESS FAIR is an annual event organized in Miami-Dade County informing communities about the connection between nutrition, fitness, safety and wellbeing.
The CNC Health, Safety, and Wellness Fair is a free event open to the public and is attended by an average of 600 individuals. The Fair was created to serve the needs of the underserved Hispanic and the immigrant communities of Miami.
Key Health issues addressed include: Asthma, Cancer, Cardiovascular Disease, Diabetes,
Sexual Health Issues – Including HIV/AIDS and other STDs – Immunization, Prenatal Care/Infant Mortality, Tobacco Cessation, Obesity, Physical Activity, and Nutrition. .
The Fair included activities such as:
General Health Screenings for all ages (Blood Pressure, Cholesterol, Spinal and Much More)

Nutrition and Fitness Expert Advice

Celebrity Guests Presentations

Giveaways / Prizes / Raffles

Snacks and Drinks

Fun Games and Family Activities

The CNC Health And Wellness Fair was held at The  Marlins Park and Stadium. NAMI Miami-Dade set an information Table.

NAMI MDC MEMBERSHIP
NAMI Miami-Dade County
“The Annual Social Membership Picnic”
 At Miami’s Tropical Park
Nami Miami Dade County Directors, Membership and Volunteers at Tropical Park Picnic 2016
NAMI Miami-Dade County At Tropical Park for Music & Fun
This NAMI MDC Picnic is a Fun Time For All which Included Socializing, Food, Music and Fellowship
The Next General Membership Meeting will be January 30th, 2017 at 7:00pm
Coconut Grove Sailing Club 2nd Floor 2990 South Bayshore Drive
(Speaker To be Announced)

 

REMEMBER
SUNDAY,SEPT. 25, 2016
As the Day When 5,225 Performers Banded Together For
#ConcertAcrossAmerica to #EndGunViolence

A Mental Health Campaign

Mary Giliberti NAMI CEO
NAMI Celebrates Senate Passage of HR 34
-“This is a Pivotal Milestone on the Road to Mental Health Reform,” said Mary Giliberti, NAMI’s Chief Executive Officer.
“By passing HR 34, the House and Senate have shown that they consider fixing our nation’s broken mental health system to be a national priority.  We are grateful for their dedication to getting this important legislation passed.   This momentum must be sustained and strengthened as Congress moves forward.”

Preventing Suicide

It can be frightening and intimidating when a loved one reveals or shows signs of suicidal thoughts. However, not taking thoughts of suicide seriously can have a devastating outcome. If you think your friend or family member will hurt herself or someone else, call 911 immediately. There are a few ways to approach this situation.

 

A Letter from The Board of Directors:
We write to ask for your continued support and involvement in NAMI.  If you are not a member, please join.  If you are a member, please consider adding a donation to your membership.

You likely are well aware of the huge gaps in Miami’s mental health care system.  We volunteers at NAMI Miami-Dade County are working hard to fill these gaps so that families like ours and yours, do not have to endure the confusion, isolation, lack of resources and feelings of hopelessness that occur when a loved one has a mental illness. Hope and recovery are possible; but the skills and tools that NAMI delivers are critical to achieving both.

With a new, energized, and dedicated volunteer Board, NAMI Miami-Dade County is embarking on an exciting expansion: to bring NAMI National’s acclaimed programs to our families, consumers, veterans, schools, faith communities and providers.  However, we cannot do this alone.  We need members and volunteers to help us accomplish our goal to support, educate and advocate for people living with mental illness and their families.  The needs in our community for this programming are huge.  In order to success with our vision, WE NEED YOU!
OUR CURRENT PROGRAMS
If you haven’t kept up with us recently, allow us to give you an update of the programs we have been providing (all free of charge):
  • Family Support Groups are for loved ones (18 and over) of individuals living with mental illness.
    • At Banyan Crisis Center, in English and Spanish
    • At Baptist Hospital (Kendall) in English and Spanish
    • At Homestead Hospital in English
    • At Fellowship House (Palmetto Bay)
    • At GEO Care Florida State Hospital in English
  • Consumer Support Groups are peer-led support groups for adults living with mental illness.
    • At Kendall Presbyterian Church (English)
    • At Coral Gables Financial Center (Spanish)
  • Family-to-Family course is a 12-session educational program for family, significant others and friends of people living with mental illness. Classes are offered in English and in Spanish.
  • Peer-to-Peer is a 10-session unique, experiential learning program for people with any serious mental illness who are interested in establishing and maintaining their wellness and recovery.
  • Membership meetings: we convene quarterly speaker meetings at which key thought leaders present relevant topics such as Mental Health First Aid; medication management; clinical trials; the Miami police response to calls about mental illness, nutrition and more.
  • QUICK LINK: Visit Our Website for More Information

Visit NAMI MIAMI
Organized  Since:
November 1, 2016
Introduction
Our mission is to educate, support and advocate for those who live with mental illness, and their families. Experienced and NAMI trained people with mental illness lead our Peer Support Groups and family members lead our Family Support Groups.
NAMI Miami Dade Meetup is for both adults with any mental illness or their family or loved ones looking to find support and community. All support groups are FREE. NAMI is a non-profit organization focusing facilitating living productive lives of people of all ages, living with mental illness. www.NAMIofMiami.org
Join us on Facebook, by liking our Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/NamiMiamiDade/

The Department of Children and Families Substance Abuse and Mental Health Program Office is pleased to publish the Florida Peer Services Guidance Handbook.
This document is target specific, to benefit Managing Entities, Behavioral Health service providers, Managed Care Organizations, community partners, Drop-in/Clubhouse and Peer operated programs.

                             

                                              
                                                  Listing Of
                                        The Board of Directors
                                        
 
 
Office of PRESIDENT: Robin Cole- State Substance Abuse and Mental Health Planning Council Committee Chair -“Seeking to Better this Community by Striving to be the Change I Wish to see in the World”
 
Office of VICE-PRESIDENT: Susan Racher – Board Director South Florida Behavioral Health Network Inc., Co-Chair University of Miami Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Science, Miami-Dade County Public Schools Treasury Advisory Board, Vice-President and CFO Wallace Coulter Foundation
Office of VICE-PRESIDENT: Kathy Coppola, Esq.
Office of TREASURER: Maria Rivero – Miami-Dade County Finance Department
Office of SECRETARY: Vanessa Madroza, Ph.D
 
Officer MEMBER AT LARGE: Anna Shustack, MSW
Officer MEMBER AT LARGE: J.C. Garrido – Board Director The Key Clubhouse of South Florida, Miami-Dade County Board of County Commissioners Xavier L. Suarez, District 7
BOARD DIRECTOR: Jorge Arenas, MS
   
BOARD DIRECTOR: Carlos Larrauri R.N., B.S.
 
BOARD DIRECTOR: Shawn Khosravi – Vice-Chair Vizcaya Museum and Gardens Trust, Professor of Business Florida International University, President Bankers Companies LLC
BOARD DIRECTOR: David Vittoria – MSW, MCAP, CPP, ICADC, NCAC II
Assistant Vice-President Addiction Treatment & Recovery Center Baptist Health South Florida, Board Director South Florida Behavioral Health Network Inc., Board Director Addiction Services Miami-Dade County, Board Director Miami -Dade County Criminal Justice Committee
BOARD DIRECTOR:
William (Ted) Franklin- Board Director South Florida Behavioral Health Network Inc.
  
Officers and Directors may be Contacted through the NAMI Office (305) 665-2540 or email

namiofmiami@gmail.com

 
 
NAMI Miami-Dade County Newsletter Editor : Simone Anderson
Send Letters to The Editor
Simone Anderson
Editor
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
NAMI Miami-Dade County Newsletter Vol.40 Issue 13

Carlos A. Larrauri Performing Opening Day
NAMI National Conference 2016
Like those rare instances when you actually plug in your smartphone before going to bed, the air at the 2016 NAMI National conference was charged with electricity.
Several topics of interests were explored during the conference, but I will recap two presentations. First, the need for social belonging in recovery, and second, leveraging technology to increase access to treatment.
Ask yourself, what is your loved one like when they are well. Are they smart or engaging? Do they enjoy others company? Social isolation is one of the most ubiquitous and devastating aspect of mental illness, often leaving individuals feeling abandoned.Transformation: Broad Spectrum Approaches to Promote Recovery and Resilience in Schizophrenia examined the need for social belonging in recovery. According to researchers from the University of

Pennsylvania, recovery is optimized when focusing on an individuals’ long terms goals, and creating engagement through collaborations that emphasize strengths instead of deficits. When an individual’saspirations are constructed into measurable achievements, actions towards their long-term goals can be monitored and obstacles can be addressed.

Patrick J. Kennedy Panelist
NAMI National Convention 2016
Achievements reinforces a curative psychosocial attitude, and mitigate defeatist beliefs and negative symptoms, which are often stronger predictors of poor functioning.
                             Moreover, leveraging technology creates possibilities for increasing access to treatment.
Advancing Recovery: The Use of Technology to Assist People Living With Mental Illness explored the use of technology for the day-to-day symptom management of chronic illnesses. One example of technology working towards this end, is MyStrength the app, which combines evidences based interventions, wellness tools, and holistic approaches, to provide day-to-day accessibility for symptom management. Application designers are drawing inspiration from popular media outlets, to cultivate a sense of familiarity among users, allowing participants to comfortably engage in the challenging prospect of managing their illness and potential triggers. Last but not least, applications such as the MyStrength app have the potential to increase continuity of care, by collecting objective data which can be used to measure and track an individual’s progress towards their goals across the spectrum of services available.
              In summary, I’ll leave you with a quote from researcher Brene Brown. “Connection is why we’re here. We are hardwired to connect with others, it’s what gives purpose and meaning to our lives, and without it there is suffering.” Leveraging technology may increase access to treatment, allowing people with mental illness to get back to what matters most, regaining social belonging through meaningful relationships and work.
Carlos A. Larrauri, R.N., B.A.
Board of Directors for NAMI-Miami Dade County
Conference Panel
NAMI National Convention 2016

United States House of Representatives

                               Bill HR2646
               Helping Families in Mental Health Crisis Act of 2015
               Representative Timothy Murphy (R) Pennsylvania 18th District
House-Energy and Commerce; Ways and Means; Education and the Workforce
                          Senate-Health, Education, Labor and Pensions
This bill creates the position of Assistant Secretary for Mental Health and Substance Use Disorders to take over the responsibilities of the Administrator of the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). Mental health programs are extended and training regarding mental health is expanded.
SAMHSA must establish the National Mental Health Policy Laboratory and the Interagency Serious Mental Illness Coordinating Committee.
This bill amends the Public Health Service Act to require the National Institute of Mental Health to translate evidence-based interventions and the best available science into systems of care.

Certain mental health care professional volunteers are provided liability protection.

United States Capital
Capital Hill
Pediatric mental health subspecialists are eligible for National Health Service Corps programs.
An underserved population of children or a site for training in child psychiatry can be designated as a health professional shortage area.
The protected health information of an individual with a serious mental illness may be disclosed to a caregiver under certain conditions.
This bill amends title XIX (Medicaid) of the Social Security Act (SSAct) to conditionally expand coverage of mental health services.
Part D (Voluntary Prescription Drug Benefit Program) of title XVIII (Medicare) of the SSAct is amended to require coverage of antidepressants and antipsychotics.
 The United States Representatives
House Floor

If it will not increase Medicare spending, Medicare’s 190-day lifetime limit on inpatient psychiatric hospital services is eliminated.

Health information technology activities and incentives are expanded to include certain mental health and substance abuse professionals and facilities.
This bill restricts the lobbying and counseling activities of protection and advocacy systems for individuals with mental illness. These systems must focus on safeguarding the rights of individuals with mental illness to be free from abuse and neglect.

Richard Dreyfuss
bp Magazine Cover
 Richard Dreyfuss
 Brash, Bold & Proudly Bipolar
 
             The movie star speaks
     candidly on Hollywood greed,
    civics education, how living with      
     bipolar disorder has been good  
        and why stigma is “stupid.”
Richard Dreyfuss
   

 
In May of 2008, the US House of Representatives announce July as Bebe Moore Campbell National Minority Mental Health Awareness Month.
The resolution was sponsored by Rep. Albert Wynn [D-MD] and cosponsored by a large bipartisan group to achieve two goals:
Alpha Kappa Aplha NAMI Minority Mental Health Awareness
  • Improve access to mental health treatment and services and promote public awareness of mental illness.
  • Name a month as the Bebe Moore Campbell National Minority Mental Health Awareness Month to enhance public awareness of mental illness and mental illness among minorities.
NAMI Minority Mental Health Awareness

AKA Sorority Sisters Atlanta, Ga
 

20,000 College Educated African American Women representing a diverse range of professionals many of whom serve as community Bussiness, Academic, Political and Spiritual Leaders were in attendance, along with their families, local and business as well as entertainers community and political officials Were greatful to attend in honor of Bebe Campbell Moore.

NAMI National Latino Diversity Inclusion Event at North Suffolk Mental Health Center In Reverve Massachusetts brought 40 participants. The Training focused on raising sensitivity and awareness of micro aggressions to engage and include undeserved groups in NAMI Programs.
NAMI National Latino Diversity Event
Boston Mayor Martin Walsh
NAMI Minority Mental Health Awareness Month
Boston Massachusetts brought in more then 300 advocates and residents to the City Plaza for food, fun, and music. The event focused on celebrating the AbA’s 25th with the entire disability community spreading the word about NMMHAM, NAMI Massachusetts, Bebe Moon Campbell Library, Campaign and Mental Health, Advocacy, Education and Support Programs.

                                             

                                                                    NAMI
                                                              Spokeswomen
                                                 Miss International 2015
The Next
NAMI Miami-Dade County
General MembershipMeeting
is Scheduled for
September 19th, 2016
Coconut Grove Sailing Club
2nd Floor Level
2990 South Bayshore Dr.
Coconut Grove Fl

AHAM (Art of Happiness And Mindfulness/Academy of the Heart and Mind) Education is a social investment initiative whose mission is to be a catalyst for community transformation by empowering 1,000,000 youth and at risk individuals in the Americas and beyond, with tools to cultivate presence, positivity and peace.

AHAM means “I am” in the ancient Sanskrit language, invoking the very Presence and Power at the core of human potential.

Our vision is for EVERY child to have access to tools that enable him to engage in an inner journey of self discovery, during the earlier stages in life… to tap into internal power, creative potential, and emotional intelligence.. This is harnessed in our work through present moment awareness, evidence-based meditation and mindful practices, as well as proven mind-body approaches from positive psychology.

In addition to youth, we serve veterans and other at risk populations. Our initial target communities are those that reside within the USA, Latin America, and the Caribbean.

Our programs are innovative in our application of mindfulness to economic development and ecological conservation education, our focus on using mindfulness practice as a Peace strategy, and in developing conscious communities via mindful leadership programs.

  
                    NAMI Miami-Dade County General Membership Meeting
                                                  September 19th, 2016
                     Coconut Grove Sailing Club -2nd Floor 7:00pm-9:00pm
                             2990 South Bayshore Drive Coconut Grove, Fl
                                   General Membership Meeting Speaker
                                 Founder and CEO of AHAM Education
                                                    Knellee M. Bisram

Miyam Biyalik
Miyam Biyalik “Stigma Free”

SAMHSA makes grant funds available through the Center for Substance AbusePrevention, the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment, and the Center for Mental Health Services. Find funding opportunities that support programs for substance use disorders and mental illness.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
            NAMI MDC Board President Robin Cole, Florida SAMHSA Committee Chair, this past August 2016 attended one of the many Conferences SAMHSA offers to promote the Prevention of Substance Abuse and Educate on Mental Health.                                     
                          Visit:samhsa.gov

                              Engagement

                                A New Standard for Mental Health Care
As an organization of individuals with mental health conditions and their families, NAMI knows that the U.S. system of mental health care is failing to engage many people who seek help. The facts say it all: many people who seek mental health care drop out. 70% that drop out do so after their first or second visit.
 

                                 
                                Breathe Easy
                                                       NAMI AIR                                           
NAMI AIR is intended to provide another way for people to find and give support, to connect with others through smart phone and computer tablet.

                 

NAMI Miami-Dade County President Robin Cole
Opening Day NAMI National Convention 2016
NAMI Florida Director Carol Weber, NAMI MDC President Robin Cole, NAMI National Conference Attendees
NAMI National Convention 2016 offered outstanding workshops, sessions and presentations. Many presenters and speakers have shared their presentations and additional resources on new research, services, policy initiatives, recovery strategies and much more.
Nami National Convention 2016 workshops and presentations included aspects on Recovery. Workshops and How To Series which support Advocacy and Achieving, Special Interest Workshops, SupplyingBusiness aspects of Networking
and developing Informational andEngagement Services for the Nami Community.
NAMI National Convention 2017 Washington, DC

Adults who have major depressive disorder are less likely to respond to

Charles B. Nemeroff, MD., Ph.D

antidepressant medications if they experienced physical, emotional, or sexual abuse as children, particularly before the age of 7, a new study has found. The research, reported May 3 in the journal Translational Psychiatry, suggests clinicians should identify patients with a history of childhood trauma and consider alternative treatments for their depression.

Co-leaders of the research, which assessed trauma exposure and analyzed treatment response among participants in the International Study to Predict Optimized Treatment in Depression were Dr. Leanne Williams and NARSAD 1998 Young Investigator Charles DeBattista, M.D., both at Stanford University School of Medicine. Charles B. Nemeroff, M.D., Ph.D., a 1996 and 2003 NARSAD Distinguished Investigator at the University of Miami and a member of BBRF’s Scientific Council, and BBRF Scientific Council member Alan F. Schatzberg, M.D., of Stanford University, were senior members of the team.
Researchers have long recognized that children who experience trauma, particularly due to abuse or neglect, are more likely than others to develop major depression later in life. Dr. Nemeroff and his colleagues wanted to know whether patients who experienced early-life trauma respond differently than other patients to commonly used antidepressant medications.
Depressed adults less likely to respond to antidepressants if they experienced abuse as children, esp before age 7.
To find out, they analyzed how 1,008 patients with major depressive disorder, as well as 336 healthy controls, responded to eight weeks of treatment with one of three commonly prescribed antidepressants-escitalopram (marketed under various names, including Lexapro and Cipralex), sertraline (Zoloft and others), or venlafaxine (Effexor and others).
Participants, who were between the ages of 18 and 65, completed a questionnaire that assessed childhood exposure to 18 different kinds of traumatic events. The trauma categories included interpersonal violation (physical, psychological and sexual abuse, neglect, domestic violence, or bullying), family breakup (divorce, separation, or conflict), family health (death or life-threatening illness), personal health (hospitalization, life-threatening illness or injury), natural disasters, war, birth complications, and adoption.
The team found that study participants with major depression were four times more likely than healthy participants to have experienced sexual, physical, or emotional abuse as children, and twice as likely to have been exposed to other childhood traumas.
Overall trauma exposure did not correlate to patients’ response to antidepressants, but childhood abuse did. The researchers found that individuals who had experienced the most abuse were the least likely to respond to any of the three antidepressants. Abuse that occurred prior to age 7 correlated to the poorest treatment outcomes.
Takeaway: Children who experience trauma are more likely than others to develop major depression later in life. A new study has found that childhood exposure to physical, emotional, or sexual abuse also correlates to a poor response to antidepressant medications in adults.

         
VA Mental Health Summit on September 1, 2016.

                    

NAMI MDC Board Director
Jorge Arenas M.S.
NAMI MDC Board Director

Simone Anderson A.A. MHFA

Attended this Annual Summit

NAMI MDC has Partnered with Miami-Dade County Corrections & Rehabilitation Department
NAMI MDC Board President Robin Cole, NAMI MDC Board Director & Treasurer Maria Rivero; Miami-Dade County Finance Department, NAMI-MDC Board Director Juan Garrido; Miami-Dade County Commissioner Xavier Suarez District 8. NAMI kindly excepted The Miami-Dade Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation Annual Donation to NAMI Miami-Dade County in July, 2016.

                    Classical Music South Florida

                                                                

                         Easy Listening Music
                                       By: Connie Goodman-Milone

Should you Disclose your Mental Illness at Work?
By: Beatriz Mendoza
Many of us who have mental illnesses are part of the workforce in this country. At some point during the performance of our duties the dilemma of whether to disclose or not our condition at work will arise. The answer is not simple; it depends on the particular circumstances of the worker and the company.
The question may arise at the beginning when we are applying for the job. Lately I have experienced in my own job search that many companies ask the applicant if you have a mental illness. They do apparently as part of the legal requirements not to discriminate against people with disabilities. I still do not know how to answer this question and if answering it will cost me the job or else it will protect me, so I choose the box that says rather not answer.
In my case the need to speak openly about my mental illness came when I had my first crisis. At that time I did not even know I had a mental illness but knew I was not feeling well after several sleepless nights and decided to be honest with my boss instead of using the excuse of a headache. The result is that my boss did not understand that my nerves problem prevented me from working and made me go to work anyway. The consequence was that in the middle of my shift I had a panic attack and had to leave work in the middle of the day.
After that came a short hospital stay and a recovery of two months. When I returned to work my colleagues asked me what had happened. Again I decided to be honest and tell them that I had a nerve breakdown without giving many details. What I found was not empathy but blank stares and lack of interest. So I decided to just say it was a health problem, not giving details. From that moment I have been quiet about my illness. I have told some coworkers my problems with sleep, everyone can relate to a sleepless night.
Those who live with mental illness have special needs when working. Maybe we need to ask permission to visit to the doctor frequently, or need special accommodations at work like an isolated or noise-free environment. In that case it might be a good idea to reveal the condition to your superior. It all depends on how understanding and receptive you think that person might be. Many workers prefer to talk to their superior rather than the HR person to avoid having a history in your file.
There is no simple answer to this question. Before deciding to speak consider how understanding is your boss and your company and what consequences both silence and disclosure might have.
¿Debe Revelar su Enfermedad Mental en el Trabajo?
Por: Beatriz Mendoza
Muchos de los que tenemos enfermedades mentales formamos parte de la fuerza laboral de este país. En algún momento durante el desempeño de nuestras funciones posiblemente surja el dilema de revelar o no la condición en el trabajo. La respuesta no es sencilla, depende de las circunstancias particulares del trabajador y de la empresa.
Puede que la pregunta surja al principio cuando estamos solicitando el empleo. Últimamente he experimentado en mi propia búsqueda de trabajo que muchas empresas preguntan al solicitante si tiene alguna enfermedad mental. Lo hacen aparentemente como parte de los requerimientos legales de no discriminar contra las personas que tienen discapacidades. Aún no sé como responder esta pregunta y si responderla me va a costar el trabajo o por el contrario me va a proteger, por eso elijo la casilla que dice prefiero no responder.
En mi caso la necesidad de hablar abiertamente sobre mi enfermedad mental surgió cuando tuve mi primera crisis. En ese momento ni siquiera sabia que tenía una enfermedad mental pero sabía que no me sentía bien tras varias noches sin dormir y decidí ser honesta con mi jefa en vez de usar la excusa del dolor de cabeza. El resultado es que mi jefa no entendió que mi problema de los nervios me impedía trabajar y me hizo ir al trabajo de todas maneras. La consecuencia fue que en medio de mi turno tuve un ataque de pánico y tuve que abandonar el trabajo a mitad del día.
Luego de eso vino una hospitalización corta y una recuperación de dos meses. Cuando regresé al trabajo mis compañeros me preguntaban qué me había pasado. De nuevo decidí ser honesta y contarles que había tenido un problema de los nervios sin dar muchos detalles. Lo que encontré no fue empatía sino miradas vacías y falta de interés. Entonces decidí simplemente decir que era un problema de salud, y no dar detalles. A partir de ese momento he sido reservada sobre mi enfermedad. A algunos compañeros les he contado mis problemas para dormir, todo el mundo se puede relacionar con una noche de insomnio.
Los que vivimos con enfermedades mentales tenemos necesidades especiales a la hora de trabajar. Tal vez tenemos que pedir permisos frecuentes para visitar al doctor, o necesitamos acomodaciones especiales en el trabajo para desempeñarnos como un ambiente libre de ruido o aislado. En ese caso tal vez sea buena idea revelarle a su superior su condición. Todo depende de qué tan comprensiva y receptiva crea usted que va a ser esta persona. Muchos trabajadores prefieren hablar con su superior que con la persona de recursos humanos para evitar tener un historial en su hoja de vida.
No hay una respuesta sencilla a esta pregunta. Antes de decidirse a hablar considere que tan comprensivos son su jefe y su empresa y que consecuencias tendría tanto callar como revelar su enfermedad mental.

 

Volunteers make a world of difference in many ways and are at the core of NAMI’s mission to transform the lives of families and individuals who are affected by mental health challenges.
If you are interested in finding out more information about how to become a volunteer please email our Volunteer Coordinator, Denise Berriz atdberriz@gmail.com or call our office helpline at (305)665-2540.
We offer opportunities for internships as well. Please communicate with the Volunteer Coordinator for more details.
Nos encantan los voluntarios
Los voluntarios hacen la gran diferencia en muchos aspectos y son el corazón de la misión de NAMI de transformar las vidas de familias e individuos que se ven afectados por retos de salud mental.
Si estás interesado en averiguar más información sobre cómo
convertirte en voluntario por favor manda un correo electrónico a nuestra Coordinadora de Voluntarios Denise Berriz adberriz@gmail.com o llama (305) 665-2540 Link: Send us and email!

NAMI Family-to-Family is a free, 12-session educational program for family, significant others and friends of people living with mental illness.
It is a designated evidenced-based program. Research shows that the program significantly improves the coping and problem-solving abilities of the people closest to an individual living with a mental health condition.
  • NAMI Family-to-Family is taught by NAMI-trained family members who have been there, and includes presentations, discussion and interactive exercises.
  • All instruction and course materials are free to class participants
  • Over 300,000 family members have graduated nationwide.
In the greater Miami-Dade area, please call Lew Gramer at 305-562-1735or email namiofmiami@gmail.com.
NAMI Peer-to-Peer is a unique, experiential learning program for people with any serious mental illness who are interested in establishing and maintaining their wellness and recovery. The course was written by Kathryn Cohan McNulty, a person with a psychiatric disability who is also a former provider and manager in the mental health field and a longtime mutual support group member and facilitator.
Mentors are trained in an intensive three day training session and are supplied with teaching manuals.
For general inquiries, please contact Lew Gramer, 305-562-1735 or Jorge Arenas 305-960-7596, peer teacher

Peer Support Groups
Kendall
NAMI Peer support group meetings are held on the 1st and 3rd Tuesdays of each month from 7:30 to 9:00 PM at KENDALL PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, 8485 SW 112th Street, Miami FL 33156 in the northernmost meeting room. Support groups are open to all adults with a mental illness regardless of diagnosis. For more information call Jerry at (305) 608-2881or Patrick at (305) 773-1905.
Kendall En Espanol
NAMI Peer support group in Spanish is held the 2nd Wednesday of each month from 7:30 to 9:00 PM at CORAL GABLES FINANCIAL CENTER, 299 Alhambra Circle, Coral Gables, FL 33134. Corner entrance, take elevator to 2nd floor and follow NAMI signs to the conference room. For more info, call Jorge at (305) 960-7596.
En Español
El grupo de apoyo entre iguales en Español de NAMI se reúne el 2do miércoles de cada mes de 7:30 a 9:00 PM en CORAL GABLES FINANCIAL CENTER, 299 Alhambra Circle, Coral Gables. Use la entrada de la esquina, tome el elevador al segundo piso y siga las indicaciones hacia el salón de conferencias. Los grupos de apoyo están disponibles para todos los adultos con enfermedad mental sin importar su diagnóstico. Para más información llame a Jorge al (305) 960-7596.

Family Support Groups

Miami

Banyan Crisis Center – 3800 West Flagler Street, Miami, Florida 33134. In English: Every fourth Wednesday of the month 8:00 – 9:30 P.M. beginning 3/23/16 . For more information, please contact Sarai Martin at 786-378-5565 or smartin@banyanhealth.org
En Español: Segundo miércoles del mes 8:00 – 9:30 P.M. Para mas información llame a Sylvia al 305-815-6903
 
Kendall
BAPTIST HOSPITAL MEDICAL ARTS BUILDING – West Tower:  8950 North Kendall Drive, first floor, Miami, FL 33176
English speaking family support group meets the fourth Thursday of each month from 7:00 PM to 8:30 PM in Suite 105 behind the brass staircase on the first floor.
Detailed Directions: Park in the front parking lot.  Enter through the main entrance make an immediate right to Suite 105.
For more information, please contact NAMI of Miami at 305-665-2540 ornamiofmiami@gmail.com, or call Lew Gramer at 305-562-1735.
 
In Spanish
BAPTIST HOSPITAL MEDICAL ARTS BUILDING – West Tower:  8950 North Kendall Drive first floor, Miami, FL 33176
Spanish speaking family support group meets the second Monday of each month from 7:00 to 8:30 PM in Suite 105 behind the brass staircase on the first floor.
Detailed Directions: Park in the front parking lot.  Enter through the main entrance make an immediate right to Suite 105.
For more information, please contact NAMI of Miami at 305-665-2540 ornamiofmiami@gmail.com, or call Lew Gramer at 305-562-1735.
En Español
BAPTIST HOSPITAL MEDICAL ARTS BUILDING – West Tower:  8950 North Kendall Drive, primer piso, sala numero 105.  Entrando por la puerta principal el 105 queda a mano derecho.
El grupo en español para familias de aquellos que padecen un trastorno mental se reúne el segundo lunes del mes de 7 a 8:30 PM.
Direcciones Detalladas: Estacione en el parqueadero de enfrente. Entre por la entrada principal y haga inmediatamente una derecha, allí queda la suite 105.
Para mayor información, por favor contacte a NAMI of Miami al 305-665-2540 o mande un correo electrónico a namiofmiami@gmail.com.
HOMESTEAD HOSPITAL
975 Baptist Way, Homestead, FL 33033.
English speaking family support group meets the second Thursday of each month from 7:00 PM to 8:30 PM in the conference room off the main lobby.
Detailed Directions: Take Florida’s Turnpike to Exit 2 – Campbell Drive. Turn right (east) onto Campbell Dr. Hospital main entrance is less than a mile on your left. Park in main parking, enter though the main lobby.
For more information, please contact NAMI of Miami at 305-665-2540 ornamiofmiami@gmail.com, or call Lew Gramer at 305-562-1735.

FELLOWSHIP HOUSE (Palmetto Bay location)
9827 E. Hibiscus St., Palmetto Bay, FL 33157.
English speaking family support group meets the first Monday of each month from 7:00 PM to 8:30 PM in the cafeteria area. Enter through the main entrance and ring the bell to be admitted.
Detailed Directions: Fellowship House’s Palmetto Bay location is off of US 1 between SW 168th St and 184 St. If heading south on US 1, after Guava St, make a left at the light on East Hibiscus St for a 1/2 block and then a left into the parking lot; if heading north on US 1, after Indigo St, make a left at the light on E. Hibiscus St for a 1/2 block and then a right into the parking lot. FH is situated in a small strip shopping center, whose largest tenant is the post office.
For more information, please call Steve H. at 305-773-5328, or contact Lew Gramer at 305-562-1735 or namiofmiami@gmail.com.
South Broward: GEO CARE/SFBHN
 NAMI support group meets the 3rd Saturday of each month from 10 A.M. to noon in the Mental Health Resource Center in the Administration Building. The hospital is located at 800 E. Cypress Dr., Pembroke Pines, 33025.
Note: There is never a charge for attending a support group or any other NAMI of MDC service. All Groups are open to families of those affected by mental illness.
Lew Gramer at 305-562-1735 will gladly answer your questions.
 
Please visit our website for more information on other family support group location and dates as well as consumer support groups.www.namiofmiami.orgCTCT-20150913_091329
 
 
YOU ARE NOT ALONE

NAMI Miami-Dade County Recognizes Our Long Time Board Director Lew Gramer Ph.D
Lew is recognized for his dedication, service and commitment to NAMI MDC Board and the many families and individuals assisted in need of Mental Health Care Support in Miami-Dade County.
Lew Gramer Ph.D
Lew has served as NAMI Educational Program Director, leading NAMI Family to Family Support Education as well as NAMI Family Support Group Facilitation. Lew will continue to remain committed to our Family Support Groups as a Co-Facilitator.
“Thank you for all you have given over the years and your ongoing commitment to the community and mental health.” – NAMI Board Director Anna Shustack
” NAMI Organization as a whole and myself as a Consumer and individual are totally indebted to you Lew, for your care, support and kindness, Thank you.” – NAMI Board Director Simone Anderson

 

“You were our role model and we appreciate all the ground work you laid to help NAMI become what it is today.” – NAMI Family to Family Support Facilitator Sara Horton

                             

                                 
                                
                               THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS
                               NAMI MIAMI-DADE COUNTY
                                           OFFICERS & DIRECTORS
 
 
PRESIDENT: Robin Cole- State Substance Abuse and Mental Health Planning Council Committee Chair -“Seeking to Better this Community by Striving to be the Change I Wish to see in the World”
 
 
VICE-PRESIDENT: Kathy Coppola, Esq.
 
 
VICE-PRESIDENT: Susan Racher – Board Director South Florida Behavioral Health Network Inc., Co-Chair University of Miami Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Science, Miami-Dade County Public Schools Treasury Advisory Board, Vice-President and CFO Wallace Coulter Foundation
 

TREASURER: Maria Rivero – Miami-Dade County Finance Department

SECRETARY: Vanessa Madroza, Ph.D
 
MEMBER AT LARGE: Anna Shustack, MSW
BOARD DIRECTOR: Jorge Arenas, MS
  
BOARD DIRECTOR: Simone Anderson – CIT Crisis Intervention Training Instructor Miami-Dade County Department of Corrections & Rehabilitation, Board Director Toastmasters International, South Florida Writers Association Conference Committee, Homestead Center for the Arts Ways and Means Committee, MHFA
 
BOARD DIRECTOR: Carlos Larrauri R.N., B.S. – NAMI Miami-Dade County Programs Director
 
BOARD DIRECTOR: Shawn Khosravi – Vice-Chair Vizcaya Museum and Gardens Trust, Professor of Business Florida International University, President Bankers Companies LLC
 
BOARD DIRECTOR: J.C. Garrido – Board Director The Key Clubhouse of South Florida, Miami-Dade County Board of County Commissioners Xavier L. Suarez, District 7
BOARD DIRECTOR: David Vittoria – MSW, MCAP, CPP, ICADC, NCAC II
Assistant Vice-President Addiction Treatment & Recovery Center Baptist Health South Florida, Board Director South Florida Behavioral Health Network Inc., Board Director Addiction Services Miami-Dade County, Board Director Miami -Dade County Criminal Justice Committee


BOARD DIRECTOR:
William (Ted) Franklin- Board Director South Florida Behavioral Health Network Inc.
 
 
Officers and Directors may be Contacted through the NAMI Office (305) 665-2540 or email

namiofmiami@gmail.com

 
NAMI Miami-Dade County Newsletter Editor : Simone Anderson
Send Letters to The Editor
Simone Anderson
Editor
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Like us on FacebookFollow us on TwitterView on InstagramView our videos on YouTube
NAMI Miami-Dade County Newsletter Vol.40 Issue 12

                  The Produce Prescription
         You’re a Dinner Date Away From A More Balanced, Nourished Self
Ellen Kanner
Make a dinner date.  With yourself. Sit down and treat your amazing body and soul to a dazzling meal.  You deserve it.  And you need it.  Taking time for yourself, eating regular meals, rather than doing a grab-and-go or snacking all day keeps your blood sugar and your mood stable and avoids cravings. The trouble is, we so seldom do it. 
How and when you eat affects your overall wellness.  So, of course, does what you eat. Processed foods, which makes up the majority of most American diets, have any naturally present nutrients processed right out of them and extra fat, sugar, salt and chemicals that you don’t need added in.  These additives blast your mouth with flavor, but sap the body and spirit.  We’re more likely to reach for these foods when we’re hurried, harassed or hangry (hungry +angry = hangry).  Alas, we’re that way much of the time. 
 
My mantra is less processed, more produce.  Focus more on whole grains, beans, nuts, seeds, bright spices, tender herbs and a rainbow of fresh
seasonal produce. The problem with produce – fresh fruits and vegetables -is they’re saddled with the geeky rep of being good for you.  As though that’s a bad thing. If you knew there was a pill that supported your body and stabilized, even lifted your mood, had anti-inflammatory and immunity-enhancing benefits, was richin vitamins, minerals and a wealth of antioxidants, you’d pop it in a heartbeat.  I can hook you up with just such an item.  I’m not talking about pills, I’m talking about produce, like tawny, creamy sweet potato, cool, crisp celery, leafy greens from kale to dandelion.  
Seasonal produce is affordable, nutrient-dense and pleasurably fresh.  Think of the berries of summer, their deep color, their fragrance, how they feel in your mouth, plump and cool and ripe with sweet juice.  Blueberries, raspberries, strawberries and other fresh summer produce are in everyone’s wheelhouse and on no one’s foods to avoid. They’re naturally full of phytogoodness like anthocyanins, fiber, manganese and vitamin K.
One of my Veg Therapy clients had never heard of anthocyanins before, but immediately started hunting them down in pill form. I don’t know if she found them. I do know our bodies process nutrients in whole foods better than in supplements.  My advice to her and to you is to get your dose of anthocyanins – the antioxidant-rich pigment in certain produce – in berries and beets, red cabbage and tomatoes, the foods they’re in naturally, to choose food in its whole, fresh, delicious state.
You can’t get the same thrill – or body and mood benefit – in a pill.  Our bodies process pills less efficiently than they do whole foods.  Besides, what would you rather do, take a magnesium supplement or eat a square of dark chocolate?  There’s a physiological reason we often crave chocolate when we’re stressed.  Dark chocolate is a good source of emotion-balancing magnesium as well as a range of antioxidants and of course, pleasure   Allow yourself the whole pleasure of whole food.  By the way, chard and black beans are good sources of magnesium, too – just sayin’.
We expect medication to be good for us.  Too often we don’t take into account what Hippocrates said back in 400 BC – let food be thy medicine and medicine thy food. The cleaner – and more colorful – your diet, the lighter your load.  Fresh produce lightens your body and lifts your spirits.
Devoting your whole self – you attention, your time, your senses – to a leisurely produce-rich meal improves digestion and hydration, helps with weight loss or weight management (eating slower means you eat less), decreases stress and increases satisfaction.  But it’s a far cry from the pills, processed food and the hurry-up-and-eat pace we consider normal.  Change is challenging. The good thing is, you don’t have to do it all at once.
I’m a big believer in the Rule of One, to create change and form positive new habits by committing to one thing -pledging to eat one meatless meal this week, adding one seasonal fruit or vegetable to your shopping list, swapping up one fast food meal for a trip to your local farmers market. In my book Feeding the Hungry Ghost: Life, Faith and What to Eat for Dinner, I say change your diet, change your life, change the world.
Start by making one dinner date with yourself.  Discover what you’ve been missing – a more balanced, more nourished you.  You can invite your friends and family to the feast, too, because wellness, pleasure and produce, like chocolate, deserves to be shared.

                                      Govenor Rick Scott
                                   Signature Signing Ceremony 
            SB-12 Mental Health Care and Substance Abuse Bill
          Appropriations Committee & Senators Garcia, Galvano and Ring
Govenor Rick Scott
Senators Garcia, Galvano & Ring
The bill addresses Florida’s system for the delivery of behavioral health services. The bill provides for mental health services for children, parents, and others seeking custody of children involved in dependency court proceedings. The bill identifies the components of a coordinated system of care to be provided for individuals with mental illness or substance use disorder and defines a “No Wrong Door” model for accessing care.
The Agency for Health Care Administration (AHCA) and the Department of Children and Families (DCF) are directed to modify licensure requirements through the rulemaking process if possible, to create an option for a single, consolidated license to provide both mental health and substance use disorder services. For modifications requiring statutory revisions, the agency and the department shall produce a plan for consolidation to the Legislature by November 1, 2016.
Additionally, by December 31, 2016, AHCA and DCF are directed to develop a plan to increase federal funding for behavioral health care; compile detailed documentation of the cost and reimbursements for Medicaid covered services provided to Medicaid eligible individuals by providers of behavioral health care services. If the report provides clear and convincing evidence that Medicaid reimbursements are less than the costs of providing services, the agency and the department shall request additional trust fund authority necessary to draw down Medicaid funds as a match for the documented general revenue expenditures supporting covered services delivered to eligible individuals.
To more closely align the Baker Act (mental illness) and Marchman Act (substance abuse), the bill modifies the legal procedures and timelines, as well as processes for assessment, evaluation, and provision of services.
The duties and responsibilities of DCF are revised for the contract and oversight of the managing entities[1]. The duties and responsibilities of the managing entities are also revised. The new duties include, among others, the requirement to conduct a community behavioral health care needs assessment every three years in the geographic area served by the managing entity; determine the optimal array of services to meet the needs identified in the needs assessment and develop strategies to divert people with mental illness or substance use disorder from the criminal justice system and collaborate with the Department of Juvenile Justice and the state court system to integrate behavioral health services with the child welfare system.
By September 1 of each year, beginning in 2017, each managing entity is required to develop and submit a plan to the department describing the strategies for enhancing services and addressing three to five priority needs in the service area. The plans must be developed with input from consumers and their families, local governments, local law enforcement agencies, and other stakeholders.
The department is directed to update the crisis stabilization services utilization database. The database is renamed the acute care services utilization database. Managing entities are required to collect utilization data from all public receiving facilities situated within its geographical service area and all detoxification and addictions receiving facilities under contract with the managing entity.
The bill allows a crisis stabilization unit, a short-term residential treatment facility, or an integrated adult mental health crisis stabilization and addictions receiving facility that is collocated with a centralized receiving facility to be in a multi-story building and may be authorized on floors other than the ground floor.
The department is to develop certain forms to be used by law enforcement for use when a person is taken into custody under chapter 397. The department is also to develop a website and post standard forms to be used to file a petition for involuntary admission under the Marchman Act.
The bill has a fiscal impact of $400,000 in nonrecurring funds from the Operations and Maintenance Trust Fund to DCF for the purpose of modifying the existing crisis stabilization database to collect and analyze data and information pursuant to s. 397.321, F.S.
Florida Govenor Rick Scott
NAMI Miami-Dade County President Robin Cole,
NAMI Florida Board Director Imelda Medina
These provisions take effect July 1, 2016
SB-12 Mental Health & Substance Abuse Bill Signing Ceremony

 

                  Special Presentation
                  National Alliance on Mental Illness of Miami-Dade County
                                                 from
              Miami-Dade County Board of Commissioners
Special Presentation to NAMI of Miami-Dade in recognition of Mental Health Month took place on Tuesday, May 3rd, in the Commission Chambers of Government Center, 111 NW 1st Street, Miami, Fl.
The Presentation was made around 9:15 a.m. NAMI was given the opportunity to say a few words immediately after the Proclamation was presented.
Miami-Dade County Board of County Commisioners NAMI Proclamation
Miami-Dade County
Board of County Commissioners
NAMI Proclamation

 

          15th Annual
                  Mental Health Transformation in Action Conference
                                Awards Ceremony & Luncheon
                     FOR CONSUMERS, LAW ENFORCMENT, AND COMMUNITY PARTNERS
Mental Health

Transformation in Action

 

This Conference happened on Wednesday, May 11, 2016 at Jungle Island, Treetop Ballroom 1111 Parrot Jungle Trail, Miami.
Judge Steven Leifman
Master of Ceremony, Honorable Steven Leifman, Associate Administrative Judge, Eleventh Judicial Circuit of Florida, County Court Criminal 
Guest Speaker: Matthew Federici,
Executive Director
Copeland Center for Wellness &Recovery
The values and ethics of WRAP(Wellness, Recovery, Action, Plan) are the cornerstone of what Dr. Mary Ellen Copeland’s work and of all the Copeland Center trainings. Within that framework, Matthew will present his own personal and professional perspectives of Recovery and WRAP including the strength and the effective use of peer specialists.
Matthew Federici
Guest Speaker: Pete Early, Journalist
Too often the Nation only hears about Mental Illness when tragedy strikes. But there are warriors for mental wellness in many fields, fighting for better treatment and working to defy stigma. CNN recognizes Pete Early as one of those warriors. When Pete’s life was turned upside down by the events that recounted in his Book ” Crazy”, He became a staunch Advocate for Mental Health Reform. This crusade has taken him to 48 different states and multiple countries around the globe. Pete is known to promote Mental Health transformation that will insure successful recovery programs are available in all communities, so that jail becomes the last resort.
Pete Early

        Community Innovations in Mental Health
NAMI Miami-Dade County, Community Experts, Grant Makers and Health Care Leaders joined this Innovative Forum, supported by The United Way of Miami-Dade, to discuss and address issues relating to funding, utilized care and inniciatives to reach and improve the ability to equipt the community with Mental Health Care Resources.

Nami Miami-Dade County
Board Director
Susan Racher

NAMI MIAMI DADE COUNTY
GENERAL MEMBERSHIP MEETING
COCONUT GROVE SAILING CLUB
JUNE 20TH, 2016

NAMI Miami-Dade County General Meeting will be held on June 20th, 2016 at The Coconut Grove Sailing Club  2nd Floor at 7:00pm
Presenting Speaker:
Rita Tybor, MA
Director of Student Wellness
Miami Dade College
The ASAP Program’s objectives are to develop college-wide policies that support Suicide Prevention Programs with a direct link to the College’s current behavioral threat assessment; reduce the Stigma associated with Mental Health and Behavioral Health Issues college-wide in a culturally competent manner and reaching special populations; and to promote help seeking among those at-risk, as well as increasing the knowledge base of the College Community to facilitate awareness and early identification of Mental and Behavioral Health Issues. All of the Program’s activities have been formulated to meet the needs of the Commuter College aspect of Miami Dade College and to provide flexibility in implementation across the institution’s Eight Campuses, which each have a uniquely diverse Student Population makeup.
 

 

 

I

                       NAMI MIAMI-DADE COUNTY
                 MENTAL HEALTH FILM FESTIVAL
Nami Film Festival was an evening to welcome families, Consumers, Mental Health Advocates and Friends to share in Stories, Films and Presentations from Mental Health Care Professionals, Educators and Advocates alike, in open honest talk about issues being faced today.
Carlos A. Larrauri, R.N., B.A. a member of the Executive Board of Directors of NAMI Miami-Dade County Larrauri is excited to be part of the “REEL MINDS” Film Festival, and provided a forum for the Stories of Individuals living in Recovery, helping transform the discourse on Mental Health and stop the Stigma.

Italome Ohikhuare, aspiring Filmmaker and Actress Film Festival featured artist, earned her MFA in Film Production from the University of Miami and wrote, produced and starred in her first short film “The Mermaid” which is currently being developed into a Feature Film with a Fellowship from the Sundance Institute and the Knight Foundation. The film”The Mermaid” was

one of the featured films of the NAMI Film Festival evening.

In additional attenedance speaking of CIT and Mental Health Awareness was Habsi W. Kaba, MS, MFT, CMS, Crisis Intervention Team (CIT)

Habsi is the Crisis Intervention Team Coordinator for Miami-Dade County’s Criminal Mental Health Project. Ms. Kaba has a Masters in Marriage and Family Therapy with a background in psychosocial rehabilitation and recovery. She conducts crisis intervention training for all law enforcement agencies, local
and federal Hostage/Crisis Negotiators, U.S Marshalls, School Resource Officers, Police Academy Trainees, 911 Emergency Communications personnel.

Lydia R. Malcolm, Ph.D. Postdoctoral Fellow was the final speaker for the event Lydia is a Postdoctoral Fellow,Program Coordinator for the EPI-A program, and an adjunct professor at Nova Southeastern University. Her Predoctoral internship was completed at Yale School of Medicine and postdoctoral research completed at the University of Miami, Department of Neurology, Division of Neuropsychology. She was so excited to share what she had learned within the EPI-A program!

It was a great evening shared by all.
NAMI Miami-Dade County
President Robin Cole,
VP Denise Berriz
Milander Center for Arts & Entertainment

“Thank you very much for having NAMI Miami-Dade County at the Planning Table. Physical Disabilities are frequently self evident and have been addressed over the years. Mental Illness brings about challenges that are handicapping but not so evident.”
– Jorge Arenas, Miami-Dade County Board Director

The 2016 NAMI National Convention, July 6-9 in Denver, will gather nearly 2,000 mental health activists and advocates from across the United States and other countries. The convention educates, encourages and empowers a diverse community that is passionate about building better lives for people affected by mental illness. This year’s theme is “Act. Advocate. Achieve.”
The NAMI 2016 National Convention will feature: Top-notch researchers and clinicians providing information and tools to advance and sustain recovery from mental illness. People living with a mental illness and their families providing important perspectives on recovery. Strategies and tactics to effectively advocate for changing the mental health system in our nation. Abundant networkingopportunities to learn about how we can improve the lives of all people living with mental illness and their families. Inspiration, innovation and an exhilarating four days in Denver.

                               



The Families and Members of NAMI of MIAMI are here to help! We offer understanding to anyone concerned about mental illnesses and the treatment of mental illness.

INNOVATIVE RESEARCH The Brain & Behavior Research Foundation
In trying to develop new treatments for patients with difficult-to-treat depression, some researchers have turned to drugs that act on different systems of the brain. One such class of drugs is opioids, which affect the brain’s opioid system and have been used to treat mood problems for centuries, before being displaced in the 1950s by the first generation of modern antidepressants. Although recent research has reopened the investigation on opioids, showing the brain’s opioid system is involved in mood disorders, the use of opioid medications is limited because they are addictive and may be abused.

A Stigma Free Pledge
Beatriz Mendoza
By: Beatriz Mendoza
It’s been almost 10 years since I was diagnosed with a mental illness and each day I work to be stigma free. In this May as Mental Health Awareness month I want to revise the pledge I made and analyze how much I am sticking to it.
The first step of the NAMI Stigma Free Pledge is to educate yourself and others. That was the first thing I did when faced with my new reality. I dedicated myself to reading everything I could find about my diagnosis on the Internet and in books. Then I wrote a letter to my family members telling them about my situation in an attempt to educate them about mental illness. Finally I used Internet support groups and did my part by creating an Internet forum in Spanish to discuss about mental illness. I even went on speaking openly at work about my mental health crisis until I decided to stop when faced with the stigma of others.
The second step is to see the person, not the illness. For some time I could only see in myself the illness. The weight of this new condition was so heavy that did not allow me to see that I am much more than a diagnosis. Slowly with time I stop giving so much importance to my condition and started to accept myself the way I am. Today I give my diagnosis the importance it deserves with allowing that to define who I am. It is not something that I go on publishing but I don’t hide it either. You never see people talking about their illness unless people ask.
The third step is to take action in mental health matters. Being a NAMI Miami Dade volunteer is part of the action as it was on its moment the mental health forum. I am always ready to send an email or call my representative in Washington whenever there is a bill that will improve the mental health services in this country. Also by participating in support groups I get closer to the reality of the challenges and difficulties that we face but also to the accomplishments of the participants and help others in their recovery and at the same time help myself.
If you have not yet done the NAMI Stigma Free Pledge I invite you to do it. Follow these simple three steps and you will be contributing to be part of the solution and not the problem. Lets stomp stigma.
                                                                              
Una promesa libre de estigma
By Beatriz Mendoza
Han pasado casi 10 años desde que fui diagnosticada con una enfermedad mental y cada día trabajo para estar libre de estigma. En este mes de mayo de la concientización sobre la salud mental me he dado a la tarea de revisar la promesa y analizar que tanto la estoy cumpliendo.
El primer paso de la promesa de NAMI es educarse a uno mismo y a los demás. Eso fue lo primero que hice al enfrentarme con mi nueva realidad. Me dedique a leer en internet y en libros todo lo que pudiera encontrar acerca de mi diagnóstico. Luego escribí una carta a mis familiares contándoles de mi situación en un intento de educarlos acerca de las enfermedades mentales. Finalmente me volqué en los grupos de apoyo por internet y además puse mi granito de arena al crear un foro en español para discutir temas de salud mental. Incluso llegué a hablar abiertamente acerca de mi crisis de salud mental en el trabajo hasta que decidí dejar de hacerlo cuando me enfrente al estigma de los demás.
El segundo paso es ver a la persona, no a la enfermedad. Por algún tiempo solo veía en mi misma la enfermedad. El peso de esta nueva condición era tan grande que no me permitía ver que soy mucho mas que un diagnóstico. Poco a poco con el tiempo dejé de darle tanta importancia a mi condición y empecé a aceparme tal y como soy. Hoy en día le doy a mi diagnóstico la importancia
que se merece sin permitir que defina quien soy. No es algo que ando publicando pero tampoco lo escondo. Nunca vez a las personas hablando sobre sus enfermedades a menos que alguien les pregunte acerca de ellas, lo mismo hago yo.
El tercer paso es tomar acción en cuestiones de salud mental. Mi voluntariado en Nami Miami es parte de esta acción así como en su momento lo fue también mi foro de salud mental. Siempre estoy lista para mandar un email o llamar a mi representante en Washington cuando hay algún proyecto de ley que sea de importancia para la mejoría de los servicios de salud mental en este país. Además al participar en grupos de apoyo me acerco a la realidad de los retos y dificultades que enfrentamos pero también veo los logros y metas cumplidas de los participantes mientras ayudo a los otros en su recuperación y al mismo tiempo me ayudo a misma.
Si aún no has hecho la promesa libre de estigma de NAMI te invito a que la hagas. Sigue estos tres pasos y estarás contribuyendo a ser parte de la solución y no del problema . Abajo el estigma.
 
Beatriz E. Mendoza
Writer – Journalist

   

Relationships
By Lucrecia Berzanski
Having healthy relationships is not easy, especially if you have problems with you emotions and/or thoughts.
 
I did not learn social skills growing up so for me it has been quite difficult. Most of us have low self esteem, to begin with. Finding our way hasn’t been easy.
 
I believe that through therapy, together with soul searching, we come to know who we are, and this is very important. We find our strengths and weaknesses. I found that a good way to “relate” for me was through emotions. Learning from my therapist that I did have all of these feelings and that it was okay, made a way for me with highly, intellectual people that I’ve enjoyed. I learned that the arena of “feeling” people lends it’s way to artistic people. Here I am like a fish in the water.
 
However there are people that don’t do feelings and caught up with these kind of people. I am not as comfortable, actually it has been frustrating and disappointing.One important thing I’ve learned (and not easily) is that not everyone is on “the same page” and when it comes to relating this is also important to know.
 
Expecting other people to meet our inner needs can also be challenging. For the most part God is the only one that knows us deeply. In prayer one ask for help with these needs.
 
When we learn some of the above ideas and put them into practice results happen. I’ve learned times alone are good and sharing with people you are comfortable with is really very wonderful.
 
Note: I believe that in order to love our friends, we first have to respect them.

 

BECOME A NAMI MIAMI-DADE COUNTY VOLUNTEER
NAMI Miami-Dade County appreciates the hard work and commitment from everybody who donates their time to help us continue our effort in helping those effected by mental illnesses.  Please consider joining our organization as a volunteer. There are several different ways you may contribute.
New volunteers are required to attend a Volunteer Orientation.
To contact us about your interest in volunteering and find out more about our next scheduled orientation please e-mail us at
 

NAMI Family-to-Family is a free, 12-session educational program for family, significant others and friends of people living with mental illness.
It is a designated evidenced-based program. Research shows that the program significantly improves the coping and problem-solving abilities of the people closest to an individual living with a mental health condition.
  • NAMI Family-to-Family is taught by NAMI-trained family members who have been there, and includes presentations, discussion and interactive exercises.
  • All instruction and course materials are free to class participants
  • Over 300,000 family members have graduated nationwide.
In the greater Miami-Dade area, please call Lew Gramer at 305-562-1735 or email namiofmiami@gmail.com.
NAMI Peer-to-Peer is a unique, experiential learning program for people with any serious mental illness who are interested in establishing and maintaining their wellness and recovery. The course was written by Kathryn Cohan McNulty, a person with a psychiatric disability who is also a former provider and manager in the mental health field and a longtime mutual support group member and facilitator.
Mentors are trained in an intensive three day training session and are supplied with teaching manuals.
For general inquiries, please contact our Education Cordinator Lew Gramer,305-5621735 or Jorge Arenas 305-960-7596, peer teacher

Peer Support Groups
Kendall: NAMI Peer support group meetings are held on the 1st and 3rd Tuesdays of each month from 7:30 to 9:00 PM at KENDALL PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, 8485 SW 112th Street, Miami FL 33156 in the northernmost meeting room. Support groups are open to all adults with a mental illness regardless of diagnosis. For more information call Jerry at (305) 608-2881or Patrick at (305) 773-1905.
Kendall En Espanol: NAMI Peer support group in Spanish is held the 2nd Wednesday of each month from 7:30 to 9:00 PM at CORAL GABLES FINANCIAL CENTER, 299 Alhambra Circle, Coral Gables, FL 33134. Corner entrance, take elevator to 2nd floor and follow NAMI signs to the conference room. For more info, call Jorge at (305) 960-7596.
En Español: El grupo de apoyo entre iguales en Español de NAMI se reúne el 2do miércoles de cada mes de 7:30 a 9:00 PM en CORAL GABLES FINANCIAL CENTER, 299 Alhambra Circle, Coral Gables. Use la entrada de la esquina, tome el elevador al segundo piso y siga las indicaciones hacia el salón de conferencias. Los grupos de apoyo están disponibles para todos los adultos con enfermedad mental sin importar su diagnóstico. Para más información llame a Jorge al (305) 960-7596

Family Support Groups

Miami: Banyan Crisis Center – 3800 West Flagler Street, Miami, Florida 33134. In English: Every fourth Wednesday of the month 8:00 – 9:30 P.M. beginning 3/23/16 . For more information, please contact Sarai Martin at 786-378-5565 or smartin@banyanhealth.org
En Español: Segundo miércoles del mes 8:00 – 9:30 P.M. Para mas información llame a Sylvia al 305-815-6903
 
Kendall: BAPTIST HOSPITAL MEDICAL ARTS BUILDING – West Tower:  8950 North Kendall Drive, first floor, Miami, FL 33176
English speaking family support group meets the fourth Thursday of each month from 7:00 PM to 8:30 PM in Suite 105 behind the brass staircase on the first floor.
Detailed Directions: Park in the front parking lot.  Enter through the main entrance make an immediate right to Suite 105.
For more information, please contact NAMI of Miami at 305-665-2540 ornamiofmiami@gmail.com, or call Lew Gramer at 305-562-1735.
 
In Spanish: BAPTIST HOSPITAL MEDICAL ARTS BUILDING – West Tower:  8950 North Kendall Drive first floor, Miami, FL 33176
Spanish speaking family support group meets the second Monday of each month from 7:00 to 8:30 PM in Suite 105 behind the brass staircase on the first floor.
Detailed Directions: Park in the front parking lot.  Enter through the main entrance make an immediate right to Suite 105.
For more information, please contact NAMI of Miami at 305-665-2540 ornamiofmiami@gmail.com, or call Lew Gramer at 305-562-1735.
En Español: BAPTIST HOSPITAL MEDICAL ARTS BUILDING – West Tower:  8950 North Kendall Drive, primer piso, sala numero 105.  Entrando por la puerta principal el 105 queda a mano derecho.
El grupo en español para familias de aquellos que padecen un trastorno mental se reúne el segundo lunes del mes de 7 a 8:30 PM.
Direcciones Detalladas: Estacione en el parqueadero de enfrente. Entre por la entrada principal y haga inmediatamente una derecha, allí queda la suite 105.
Para mayor información, por favor contacte a NAMI of Miami al 305-665-2540 o mande un correo electrónico a namiofmiami@gmail.com.
HOMESTEAD HOSPITAL – 975 Baptist Way, Homestead, FL 33033.
English speaking family support group meets the second Thursday of each month from 7:00 PM to 8:30 PM in the conference room off the main lobby.
Detailed Directions: Take Florida’s Turnpike to Exit 2 – Campbell Drive. Turn right (east) onto Campbell Dr. Hospital main entrance is less than a mile on your left. Park in main parking, enter though the main lobby.
For more information, please contact NAMI of Miami at 305-665-2540 ornamiofmiami@gmail.com, or call Lew Gramer at 305-562-1735.

FELLOWSHIP HOUSE (Palmetto Bay location) – 9827 E. Hibiscus St., Palmetto Bay, FL 33157.
English speaking family support group meets the first Monday of each month from 7:00 PM to 8:30 PM in the cafeteria area. Enter through the main entrance and ring the bell to be admitted.
Detailed Directions: Fellowship House’s Palmetto Bay location is off of US 1 between SW 168th St and 184 St. If heading south on US 1, after Guava St, make a left at the light on East Hibiscus St for a 1/2 block and then a left into the parking lot; if heading north on US 1, after Indigo St, make a left at the light on E. Hibiscus St for a 1/2 block and then a right into the parking lot. FH is situated in a small strip shopping center, whose largest tenant is the post office.
For more information, please call Steve H. at 305-773-5328, or contact Lew Gramer at 305-562-1735 or namiofmiami@gmail.com.
South Broward: GEO CARE/SFSH. NAMI support group meets the 3rd Saturday of each month from 10 A.M. to noon in the Mental Health Resource Center in the Administration Building. The hospital is located at 800 E. Cypress Dr., Pembroke Pines, 33025.
Note: There is never a charge for attending a support group or any other NAMI of Miami service. All Groups are open to families of those affected by mental illness.
Our Education Coordinator, Lew Gramer at 305-562-1735 will gladly answer your questions.
 
Please visit our website for more information on other family support group location and dates as well as consumer support groups.www.namiofmiami.orgCTCT-20150913_091329
 
 
YOU ARE NOT ALONE

NAMI MIAMI DADE-COUNTY BOARD OF DIRECTORS
 
PRESIDENT:
Robin Cole- State Substance Abuse and Mental Health Planning Council Committee Chair -“Seeking to Better this Community by Striving to be the Change I Wish to see in the World”
 
VICE-PRESIDENT:
Denise Berriz – “Philanthropy is my Mission, Mental Health Reform is my Passion, and People are my Reason”
 
TREASURER:
William (Ted) Franklin – Board Director South Florida Behavioral Health Network Inc.
 
SECRETARY:
Carlos Larrauri, R.N.
 
BOARD DIRECTOR & MEMBER AT LARGE:
Simone Anderson – CIT Crisis Intervention Training Instructor Miami-Dade County Department of Corrections & Rehabilitation, Board Director Toastmasters International, MHFA
BOARD DIRECTOR & MEMBER AT LARGE:
Jorge Arenas, MS
  
BOARD DIRECTOR:
Lewis J. Gramer, Ph.D
 
BOARD DIRECTOR:
Susan Racher – Board Director South Florida Behavioral Health Network Inc., Co-Chair University of Miami Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Science, Miami-Dade County Public Schools Treasury Advisory Board, Vice-President and CFO Wallace Coulter Foundation
 
BOARD DIRECTOR:
Shawn Khosravi – Vice-Chair Vizcaya Museum and Gardens Trust, Professor of Business Florida International University, President Bankers Companies LLC
 
BOARD DIRECTOR:
J.C. Garrido – Board Director The Key Clubhouse of South Florida, Miami-Dade County Board of County Commissioners Xavier L. Suarez, District 7
BOARD DIRECTOR:
David Vittoria – MSW, MCAP, CPP, ICADC, NCAC II
Assistant Vice-President Addiction Treatment & Recovery Center Baptist Health South Florida, Board Director South Florida Behavioral Health Network Inc., Board Director Addiction Services Miami-Dade County, Board Director Miami -DadeCounty Criminal Justice Committee
 
BOARD DIRECTOR
Anna Shustack, MSW
 
BOARD DIRECTOR:
Kathy Coppola, Esq.
BOARD DIRECTOR:
Maria Rivero – Miami-Dade County, Finance Department
 
 
 
Officers and Directors may be Contacted through the NAMI Office (305) 665-2540 or email

namiofmiami@gmail.com

 
NAMI Miami-Dade County Newsletter Editor : Simone Anderson
Send Letters to The Editor
Simone Anderson
Editor
NAMI MIAMI-DADE COUNTY NEWS
APRIL 2016
VOL. 40 Issue 11

Judith J. Wurtman Ph.D.
Founder Harvard University Medical Program
George Washington University, MIT Graduate & Clinical Studies
Judith J. Wurtman, Ph.D., Co-Author of “The Serotonin Power Diet” Eat Carbs, Nature’s own Appetite Suppressant to stop Emotional Overeating and halt Antidepressant associated Weight Gain, shares her MIT Clinical Studies and expertise discovering the connection between Carbohydrate Craving, Serotonin, and Emotional Well-Being.
In NAMI Miami-Dade County April 2016 Issue
NAMI MIAMI-DADE COUNTY
COMMUNITY OUTREACH AND IMPLEMENTATION

“INTO THE LIGHT BENEFIT”

Luncheon Benefiting The Key Clubhouse of South Florida

The Key Clubhouse of South Florida on Sunday , February 21st held a Charity Event at The Pullman Miami Airport Hotel in Miami, Fl. This event was the very first of its kind including a Reception and Silent Auction, Luncheon and Book Signing with Key Note Speaker Kevin Hines.
The Key Clubhouse of South Florida is a non-profit organization whose mission is to afford individuals whose lives have been disrupted by mental illness the opportunity to recover meaningful and productive lives through reintegration in the community and the workplace.

 

Key Clubhouse was founded on a dream by family members and consumers seeking a better way to help people with serious mental illness improve their lives and find their way back into the community. NAMI Miami-Dade County is a Supporter and Donated to this Spectacular Event.                                                          

 “INTO THE LIGHT” KEYNOTE SPEAKER
KEVIN HINES
Kevin Hines is an award-winning global speaker, bestselling author, documentary filmmaker, suicide prevention and mental health advocate who reaches audiences with his story of an unlikely survival and his strong will to live. Two years after he was diagnosed with bipolar disorder, he attempted to take his life by jumping from the Golden Gate Bridge.
He is one of only thirty-four (less than 1%) to survive the fall and he is the only Golden Gate Bridge jump survivor who is actively spreading the message of living mentally healthy around the globe.
He was awarded a Lifetime Achievement Award by the National Council of Behavioral Health in partnership with Eli Lilly. Kevin has also been awarded by SAMSHA as a Voice Awards Fellow and Award Winner, an Achievement Winner by the US Veterans Affairs and received several Marine General’s Medals.
Mental Health Advocate Kevin Hines
The Golden Gate Bridge is one of the most recognizable structures to define a modern city. Yet, for author Kevin Hines the bridge is not merely a marker of a place or a time. Instead, the bridge marks the beginning of his remarkable story. At 19 years old, Kevin attempted to take his own life by jumping off the Golden Gate Bridge – a distance which took four seconds to fall. Recently diagnosed with bi-polar disorder, Kevin had begun to hear voices telling him he had to die, and days before his attempt, he began to believe them.
The fall would break his body, but not his spirit. His story chronicles the extraordinary will of the author to live mentally well in the face of his mental illness: bipolar disorder with psychotic features. With each mental breakdown, however, the author’s desire to live mentally well- and to be a mental health advocate- pulls him from the depths of his condition. Kevin’s story is a remarkable testament to the strength of the human spirit and a reminder to us to love the life we have. His story also reminds us that living mentally well takes time, endurance, hard work, and support. With these disciplines in place, those living with even very difficult diagnoses can achieve better lives for themselves and those who help to support and care for them.
Purchase Cracked Not Broken By Keven Hines at Purchase : Cracked Not Broken

   NAMI MIAMI-DADE COUNTY  PEER TO PEER COURSE

                                         

Nami Miami-Dade County Peer to Peer Class Graduates
                                                                   
This past November 2015 thru the Month of January 2016, NAMI Miami-Dade County held the NAMI Peer to Peer 10 week Mentoring and Advocacy Course offered to those whom are Suffering or have been diagnosed with a Severe form of Mental Illness. This Class was conducted by Jorge Arenas, & Simone Anderson, whom are Nami-Miami Dade County Certified Mentors and Nami Miami-Dade County Board Directors.
This NAMI Peer to Peer Class was held Saturdays at The Key Clubhouse of South Florida. This course is meant to be a unique, experiential learning program for people with any Serious Mental Illness who are interested in establishing and maintaining their wellness and recovery.
 
This Session was a success for all of whom made the commitment of full attendance and class participation,  graduating and receiving the NAMI Certification of Completion of Peer to Peer. This class will be held again in the future. Please refer to NAMI Miami-Dade County website for further information.
                                                                                             
 

Temple Beth Am Mental Health Programs                      

 

Honest Talk about Mental Health

       “Caring for the Soul”


Honest Talk about Suicide: The Silent Epidemic

 

Temple Beth Am’s latest Forum on Mental Health was held on a Sunday from 12:30 pm-4:00 pm. For all ages, free and open to the community. This discussion brought together leading medical professionals, community leaders and cutting edge researchers to talk about and focus on the issues and address the dangers, and the risks of suicide.

 

Program Included:
– Charles B. Nemeroff, MD., Ph.D., Leonard Miller Professor& Chairman, Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, University of Miami; Director, UM Center on Aging.
– Jill Harrington, Area Director, American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, and members of her team.
– Frank J. Zenere, Ed.S., School Psychologist, Department Head/District Crisis Management Program, Miami-Dade County Public Schools, Division of Student Services.
-Rabbi Judith Kempler, Program Moderator.
-Personal Stories from suicide survivors
Temple Beth Am occasionally holds Mental Health Forums of this kind. For future Events go to this Link:Temple Beth Am

NAMI MIAMI-DADE COUNTY
APRIL 2016 GENERAL MEETING
The next NAMI of Miami General Meeting will be held on April18th, 2016 @ 7:00pm at The Coconut Grove Sailing Club – 2nd Floor 2990 South Bayshore Drive Miami, Fl
Presenting Speaker: Pam Ford, Peer Specialist South Florida Behavioral Health Network
South Florida Behavioral Health Network Peer Specialist, Pam Ford

 

Ford began working in the area of Behavioral Health and HIV/AIDS twenty years ago and holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Applied Psychology from California State University, Long Beach and a Master’s Degree in Counseling and Human Systems from Florida State University. She has worked in the communities of Broward and Miami-Dade for over sixteen years.
Ford’s personal challenges with mental health began in 2002.  Due to multiple life stressors, she began experiencing severe depression, anxiety, and panic attacks which interfered with both her professional and personal life.
Pam worked on accepting her diagnosis, overcoming shame, working with her Peer Specialist and focusing on her recovery. Ford’s Peer Specialist told her that Bayview Center was looking for a Peer Specialist for their Florida Assertive Community Treatment (FACT) Team so she applied for the position and was hired. She wanted to “give back” to the agency that had helped her so much and felt she was ready to work in the field of Behavioral Health again.  Ford was promoted to a Case Management position and continued to work on the FACT Team for two years.  She then worked in the Miami-Dade Forensic Alternative Center (MDFAC) assisting individuals with community re-entry after treatment.
In 2011, Ford was hired for the Peer Services Coordinator position at South Florida Behavioral Health Network and continues to work there today.  She is a consumer advocate and provides support and technical assistance to consumers, Peer Specialists and the Behavioral Health agencies in Miami-Dade and Monroe counties.
Ford’s personal journey is the foundation of her belief in recovery and reflects the power of peer to peer recovery.  She is motivated by consumers as well as professionals and partnerships that are formed in the community to improve the quality of our lives.
NAMI MIAMI-DADE COUNTY

SOCIAL EVENTS & FUN

seats_theater.jpgNAMI Mental Health Film Festival will be heldMay 19th 2016  at Milander Center for Arts & Entertainment 
NAMI Miami-Dade County Social Committee is busy communicating in regaurds to additional upcoming events. Stay updated and informed by our Website and Newsletter.
NAMI is proposing Holiday Parties, Fund Raisers, Picnics and BBQ’s as well as Movie Nights, and other Socials. Keep updated to join us at our next scheduled Social Event.
  event.jpg    barbeque_party_cartoon.jpg
NAMI MIAMI-DADE COUNTY

MENTAL HEALTH NEWS

Is it Possible to Minimize Weight Gain on Anti-Depressants?
Judith J. Wurtman  Ph.D. and her Lovely Pet Companion Simon
By Judith J. Wurtman Ph.D.
At a recent social event, I found myself seated next to a psychiatrist who specialized in adolescent care. I asked him whether his patients ever refused to go on medication because they were afraid they would gain weight.
“All the time,” he told me. “It is the first thing they bring up-not whether they will get better, how long will it take for the medication to work or what happens if it doesn’t. As soon as I mention the name of the drug, they ask how much weight they will gain.”
“And,” I prompted, wondering if he, like some therapists, downplayed the fattening effects of anti-depressants and other drugs used for bipolar disorder and other emotional disorders, “what do you say?”
“I tell them that most of the medications can cause weight gain but since they will be seeing me every week, they and I will be aware of it before it becomes a problem. It is true, I tell them, that you can gain twenty or thirty pounds on an anti-depressant but before you gain twenty pounds, you gain ten and before that five. We can catch the five-pound weight gain and do something about it. It isn’t as if I won’t be seeing them for three months after they start on the drug.”
Early awareness of weight gain as a side effect of antidepressants and related drugs is important because it is much easier to lose the first five pounds gained than twenty or thirty pounds gained a few months later. It seems, according to scientific publications, that many psychotropic drugs increase cravings for carbohydrates like cookies or chips and prevent the feeling of satisfaction or satiety that occurs when enough food is eaten. So snacking, especially on sugary/ high fat munchies and eating larger meals than usual add up to excess calories and excess pounds.
How these drugs ‘kidnap’ the brain’s control over appetite is still not understood. One consequence, however, that conventional weight loss programs for people on such drugs rarely work. Simply telling someone to lose weight by eating less and moving more makes no sense for people who are being treated with medications that leave them wanting to eat all the time and often too fatigued to exercise.
The best solution is to find a medication that doesn’t cause weight gain but this is hard because so many do. The second solution is to try to halt the overeating at meals and snacking by boosting the appetite curbing power of serotonin. This neurotransmitter functions (, in addition to mood regulation) to promote satiety; the feeling that you have eaten enough and don’t want to eat anymore. Boosting the synthesis of serotonin before meals is quite effective in spoiling appetite and this makes is easier to be satisfied with smaller portions or fewer between- meal snacks.
Serotonin is made when a small amount of a starchy or sweet carbohydrate is eaten. About 25-30 grams of carbohydrate ( ¾ of a cup of cheerios or a small bag of pretzels) will increase serotonin as soon as the food is digested. Fructose, the sugar in fruit and sodas, is the only carbohydrate that won’t cause serotonin to be made.
When a carbohydrate is digested, insulin is released and this allows the amino acid, tryptophan, to get into the brain quickly. Serotonin is made from tryptophan and as it is made, it begins to shut off appetite. This is why some of us find ourselves not very hungry if we munch on a dinner roll or crackers before a meal. Carbohydrates that are also high in fat like ice-cream, dough nuts and potato chips should be avoided because in addition to adding unneeded calories, the fat slows down the digestion of the carbohydrate.
These days, carbohydrates have been tagged as foods which cause immediate obesity and diets tend to restrict them or limit them entirely. But what the proponents of high protein diets don’t mention or maybe don’t know is that even though tryptophan is found in protein, eating protein prevents this amino acid from getting into the brain. In fact people who eat only protein may not be making enough serotonin. Lack of serotonin makes some high protein dieters very cranky and even though protein makes their stomachs feel full, they still may feel like eating. (This is why people have dessert even after a large steak has been eaten).
Eat protein; it is an important component of our daily diet. Eat what your body needs. But just don’t eat more than a tiny amount when eating carbohydrate to make serotonin. And don’t expect the protein to turn off the drug-induced urge to eat more.
Increasing serotonin’s ability to turn off the appetite is no guarantee that weight gain can be totally avoided on these medications. Some people gain weight without changing their food intake or exercise; in fact some try to eat less and work-out more and still find themselves gaining weight. No one knows why. Not yet anyway. Bur for most people, controlling the urge to eat more and more frequently by using the power of serotonin to turn off appetite may help to keep weight gain to a minimal.
 
Judith Wurtman Ph.D.  received her Ph.D. from George Washington University, is the Founder of The Hospital Weight-Loss Facility at Harvard University Hospital and Counsels Private Weight Management Clients. She has written Five Books, and more than 40 peer-reviewed Articles for Professional Publications. She lives in Miami Beach, Florida.
Purchase Books By Judith J. Wurtman at : Amazon Website . She may be Contacted by email for further questions on her article : frieda@mit.edu

Overactive Immune Cells Precede

 Schizophrenia

Oliver D. Howes, M.D.,Ph.D.

Diagnosis


Evidence has been mounting that overactive immune cells in the brain may be among the causal factors in at least some cases of schizophrenia. Research reported in the October 15 issue of the American Journal of Psychiatry strengthens this case: According to the study, the activity of brain-protecting immune cells called microglia is ramped up not only in people who have been diagnosed with schizophrenia, but also in people considered to be at ultra-high risk for developing the disorder.
The team of scientists conducting this research included 2013 Independent InvestigatorOliver D. Howes, M.D., Ph.D., at Imperial College London, and 2010 Distinguished Investigator Philip K. McGuire, M.D., Ph.D., at King’s College London. Dr. Peter S. Bloomfield was listed as the paper’s first author.

Microglia protect the brain from injury by engulfing and removing damaged or infected cells. But the inflammation this process causes can lead to neural degeneration and is suspected by some researchers of contributing to a variety of diseases, including Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, and multiple sclerosis.

Philip K. McGuire, M.D., Ph.D.
Several lines of evidence have implicated microglia and inflammation in schizophrenia, including elevated levels of the cells found in brain tissue after patients’ deaths. But Drs. Howes, McGuire and their colleagues wanted a clearer picture of how the immune cells behave earlier in life, when the disorder is still developing.
To find out, they used PET imaging to look for active microglia in the brains of three groups of people: 28 healthy controls, 14 people who had been diagnosed with schizophrenia and 14 people who were considered to be at ultra-high risk for developing the disorder based on a clinical assessment. About 35 percent of people in this ultra-high risk category typically go on to develop schizophrenia or another disorder involving psychosis within two years.
Psychotic illnesses have in common symptoms that indicate a loss of contact with reality. Symptoms include delusions (false beliefs) and hallucinations (a perception of something [as a visual image or a sound] with no external cause).
The scientists administered to each study participant a dye that binds to a protein on the surface of activated microglia. This enabled them to visualize the cells with PET imaging.
Their results indicated that microglial activity is elevated in schizophrenia patients and in those at very high risk of psychosis. Importantly, in those at high risk of psychosis, microglial activity was highest in those whose pre-psychotic symptoms were most severe.
The findings support the idea that inflammation is present in the brain during the development of psychotic disorders in at least some individuals, and suggest that chronic inflammation may in fact drive that development.
“A key issue for the field is whether microglial activation is secondary or primary [to schizophrenia] so our finding that microglial activation is seen in people showing at-risk symptoms is exciting, particularly as it was linked to more severe symptoms,” says Dr. Howes.
“The findings suggest that treatments to reduce microglial activation could be a new therapeutic approach to schizophrenia.”
Monitoring microglial activity might also help clinicians predict which individuals are most likely to develop the disorder.
Brain & Behavior Research Foundation
NAMI MIAMI-DADE COUNTY

LETTER TO THE EDITOR OPINION PAGE

         Authenticity
                     “Being Your Own Person”
By: Lecrecia Berzanski
                                                                                                        Artwork By : Lecrecia Berzanski
So much of the time our personality and character are formed by the places and people we have around us. This should not be so. We want to be ourselves, unique individuals, but the pressure is on to redefine us.
Character is built by the strength we find in ourselves through difficult circumstances. No one can do this for you, no mommy no daddy it’s YOU. The more you are tested through life circumstances the more you find you can.
As we grow and mature into independent persons, we know that our strength and faith in God is what makes us. There is a glow in self actualizing people. They will tell they have been “around the block” a few times and that is wasn’t easy. What exudes from them is a sort of determination that is rare, they take a step back only to gauge their footing.
Character is made, not given or bought anywhere. Personality is more like what we like and what we don’t. Personal traits come into play, are we light hearted or are we serious. We gravitate towards the things we love, in entertainment , hobbies, the way we dress, etc. Personality does not make us. We make our personality.
We long to be the person God created us to be. To be genuine and authentic makes us feel good. Putting on an act or being a camelion who changes color with the scenery is not too wonderful. Character and personality lets us be who we are!

                         Sketches & Poetic Quotes By Lecrecia Berzanski

“Great Things Never Happen Without Being

Challenged”
“Hope Begins in the Dark,
The Stubborn Hope that if you just Show Up and Try to do the Right Thing the Dawn will Come….
You Wait and Watch and Work…
You Don’t Give Up”
“In The Plight for Mental Illness,
Lets Bring Light to this Darkness”

  

 

 
 
Support Groups
 
“A Window to Hope”
By: Beatriz E. Mendoza
 
 
The first time I went to a support group it was eye opening for me. I had been recently released from the hospital after my first mental health crisis and I was desperately seeking all the information I could get about my illness. Also, my self-esteem was very low and I felt like I was the only person in the world with this condition.
 
 
Being there with that group of men and women that like me had a diagnosis of mental illness was encouraging. I was not the only one in the world with problems like mine, in fact the people in that group had more serious problems than mine, and even if it is selfish I have to admit that this was comforting.
 
 
Then I started to find not only perspective but also very valuable information about my illness, about how to manage it and I started to see the example of others that managed it successfully and were living productive lives. Also many times there were people in attendance that were not feeling well and didn’t collaborate much to the group but it was comforting to know that we were there for them and that in a distant future hopefully they will also be there for us in case we felt bad.
 
 
That is the beauty of support groups, that a sense of community is created, even if it is for a few hours between estrangers. There is a sense of belonging and often a feeling of hope. That is what motivates me to continue with the support group in Spanish that we hold with Jorge Arenas the second Wednesday of every month at 7:30 pm in the conference room of our offices in Coral Gables. The meeting is free like all the services offered by Nami Miami and they are open to adults with mental illness whether they have been diagnosed or not. We hope to see you there!
 
 
 
Los Grupos de Apoyo          
 
“Una Ventana a la Esperanza”
Spanish Translation by Beatriz E. Mendoza
 
 
La primera vez que asistí a un grupo de apoyo fue un aprendizaje para mí. Estaba recién salida del hospital tras mi primera crisis de salud mental y buscaba afanosamente toda la información que pudiera obtener acerca de mi enfermedad. También mi autoestima estaba muy baja y me sentía como si fuera la única persona en el mundo con esta condición.
 
 
Estar ahí en ese lugar junto a un grupo de hombres y mujeres que como yo tenían un diagnóstico de enfermedad mental resultó ser alentador. No era la única en el mundo con problemas como los míos, de hecho las personas de ese grupo tenía problemas muchos más serios que los míos y aunque es un poco egoísta tengo que admitir que eso me hacía sentir mejor.
 
 
Luego empecé a encontrar no sólo perspectiva sino información muy valiosa acerca de mi enfermedad, de cómo controlarla y empecé ver el ejemplo de otros que la manejaban exitosamente y tenían vidas productivas. También muchas veces había asistentes a los grupos que no se sentían bien y no aportaban mucho pero era reconfortante saber que estábamos ahí para ellos y que en un futuro ojalá muy lejano ellos estarían también ahí para nosotros en caso de sentirnos mal.
 
 
Eso es lo lindo de los grupos de apoyo, que se crea una comunidad, así sea por unas cuantas horas y entre un grupo de desconocidos. Hay un sentido de pertenencia y por lo general un sentimiento de esperanza. Eso es lo que me motiva a continuar con el grupo de apoyo en español que junto a Jorge Arenas realizamos el segundo miércoles de cada mes a las 7:30 pm en el salón de conferencias de nuestra oficinas en Coral Gables. Los grupos son gratuitos como todos los servicios de NAMI Miami y están abiertos a adultos con enfermedades mentales ya sea que estén diagnosticados o no. Los esperamos!
 

Beatriz E. Mendoza

Beatriz E. Mendoza
                                                      
Writer – Journalist
 
NAMI MIAMI-DADE COUNTY
PARTNERS IN OUR COMMUNITY

Nami Miami-Dade County has been meeting with Banyan Health Systems Directors in support of Nami based Educational Classes and Programs held at Banyan Facilities. Incorporation of that of such Programs as Family Support Groups both in English and Spanish.
Nami Miami-Dade County President Robin Cole and Vice-President Dennis Berriz have been in collaborations with Segal Intitute in discussion of Nami based Materials and Programing.
Nami Miami-Dade County Directors have been in Project Development with United Way discussing Partnership and Fund Raising Opportunities.
Nami Miami-Dade County Partners with South Florida Behavioral Health NetworkInc. in Development of all of its Programs.  Visit: South Florida Behavioral Health Network Website
Los Angeles – FOX Sports Supports, the charitable branch of FOX Sports, proudly announces two-year partnerships with National Alliance on Mental Illness and Positive Coaching Alliance, extending through the 2017 calendar year. During this time, FOX Sports focuses its charitable resources toward these two organizations in campaigns that span all FOX Sports assets and premier events, beginning with the NFL playoffs and including coverage of next season’s Super Bowl LI. The two organizations were selected by a vote of FOX Sports employees in December 2015.
“FOX Sports Supports is honored and excited to team up with these two very worthwhile organizations for the next two years,” Chris Hannan, FOX Sports Executive Vice President, Communications and Integration said. “National Alliance on Mental Illness and Positive Coaching Alliance do terrific work to make a difference in people’s lives, and we are humbled to play a small role in helping them achieve their missions.”Visit:FOXSports
Miami-Dade County Public Schools, School Health Medical Advisory Committee (SHMAC) by Florida statute, Miami-Dade County has a School Health Medical Advisory Committee. This committee is made up of public health employees, public school employees, individuals representing voluntary, or consumer groups and medical professionals from the community. The purpose of the committee is to develop a school health plan, to monitor and review school health services and to develop new school health services. Nami Miami-Dade County Board Director Simone Anderson sits on this Committee. Visit: DadeSchools.net

 Inaugural Live Oak International 5k Race benefittingNAMI Florida at the annual Live Oak International
2016 Inaugural Live Oak International 5k Race  at the annual Live Oak International in Ocala, FL

Over 650 runners and walkers participated in the 2016 Inaugural Live Oak International 5k Race benefitting NAMI Florida at the annual Live Oak International in Ocala, FL on Sunday, February 28th. The race, “Running with the Champions,” was held on the legendary grounds of the annual Live Oak International Combined Driving and Show Jumping competition.

NAMI Florida is very grateful and wants to recognize Chester Weber of Live Oak Plantation, and thank him for hosting the event at such phenomenal facilities, where participants were able to see international level competitors in the afternoon – carriage racing and jumping events, along with the famous Anheuser-Busch Clydesdales.
This was a collaborative effort with 29 NAMI affiliates throughout the state of Florida, along with Palm Chevrolet and the Big Hammock Race Series. Karen Donnelly, the star event planner and facilitator, set up an impressive course, great awards and a fantastic experience for everyone.
NAMI is the National Alliance for Mental Illness and provides education/support group/advocacy programs (including the evidence-based Family-to-Family Course) for families and individuals living with mental health conditions. Mental illness affects over 40 million Americans; about one in four families.
 Grassroots, non-profit, self-help, support and advocacy organization with over 250,000 members nationwide
 Offers information, education and support to individuals with mental illness, their families, and the public
 Includes educational programs to help manage illness and move into recovery
 Works at local, state and national levels to overcome stigma and achieve policies and services that improve the lives of people with mental illness
NAMI offers an array of peer-led education programs, support programs, initiatives and services for individuals, family members, health care providers and the general public.
NAMI’s education and support programs provide relevant information, valuable insight, and the opportunity to engage in support networks.
NAMI Florida Excepting Awards Check of Funds Raised
NAMI MIAMI-DADE COUNTY

VOLUNTEERS

BECOME A NAMI OF MIAMI VOLUNTEER
NAMI of Miami appreciates the hard work and commitment from everybody who donates their time to help us continue our effort in helping those effected by mental illnesses.  Please consider joining our organization as a volunteer. There are several different ways you may contribute.
 
New volunteers are required to attend a Volunteer Orientation.
 
To contact us about your interest in volunteering and find out more about our next scheduled orientation please e-mail us at:namiofmiami@gmail.com
NAMI MIAMI-DADE COUNTY

EDUCATION & SUPPORT PROGRAMS

NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY PROGRAM
What is NAMI’s Family-to-Family Program?
NAMI Family-to-Family is a free, 12-session educational program for family, significant others and friends of people living with mental illness.
It is a designated evidenced-based program. Research shows that the program significantly improves the coping and problem-solving abilities of the people closest to an individual living with a mental health condition.
  • NAMI Family-to-Family is taught by NAMI-trained family members who have been there, and includes presentations, discussion and interactive exercises.
  • All instruction and course materials are free to class participants
  • Over 300,000 family members have graduated nationwide.
In the greater Miami-Dade area, please call Lew Gramer at 305-562-1735 or emailnamiofmiami@gmail.com.
NAMI PEER -TO- PEER PROGRAM
Peer-to-Peer is a unique, experiential learning program for people with any serious mental illness who are interested in establishing and maintaining their wellness and recovery.


The course was written by Kathryn Cohan McNulty, a person with a psychiatric disability who is also a former provider and manager in the mental health field and a longtime mutual support group member and facilitator.


An advisory board comprised of NAMI consumer members, in consultation with Joyce Burland, Ph.D., author of the successful NAMI Family-to-Family Education program, helped guide the curriculum’s development.


Since 2005, NAMI’s Peer-to-Peer Recovery Program has been supported by AstraZeneca.
What does the course include?


Peer-to-Peer consists of ten two-hour units and is taught by a team of two trained “Mentors” and a volunteer support person who are personally experienced at living well with mental illness.


Mentors are trained in an intensive three day training session and are supplied with teaching manuals.
For general inquiries, please contact our Education Cordinator Lew Gramer, 305-5621735or Jorge Arenas 305-960-7596, peer teacher.
CONSUMER SUPPORT GROUP
Kendall: NAMI Consumer support group meetings are held on the first and third Tuesdays of the month at 7:30 PM at Kendall Presbyterian Church, 8485 S.W. 112th Street, in the second trailer. Support groups are open to all adults with a mental illness regardless of diagnosis. For more information call Judy Scheel305-378-2532.
FAMILY SUPPORT GROUPS
Note: There is never a charge for attending a support group or any other NAMI of Miami service. All Groups are open to families of those affected by mental illness Our education coordinator, Lew Gramer at 305-562-1735 will gladly answer your questions.
Kendall: BAPTIST HOSPITAL MEDICAL ARTS BUILDING – West Tower:  8950 North Kendall Drive, first floor. English speaking family support group meets the fourth Thursday of each month from 7:00 PM to 8:30 PM in Suite 105 behind the brass staircase on the first floor. Park in the front parking lot.  Enter through the main entrance make an immediate right to Suite 105.
For more information, please contact NAMI of Miami at 305-665-2540 ornamiofmiami@gmail.com, or call Lew Gramer at 305-562-1735.The Family Support Group meets in Spanish on the second Monday of the month.
En Español
Grupo de apoyo para familias de aquellos que padecen un trastorno mental
El segundo lunes del mes de 7 PM a 8:30 PM en el BAPTIST HOSPITAL MEDICAL ARTS BUILDING – West Tower:  8950 North Kendall Drive, primer piso, sala numero 105.  Entrando por la puerta principal el 105 queda a mano derecha.
Palmetto Bay (new!): FELLOWSHIP HOUSE (Palmetto Bay location) – 9827 E. Hibiscus St., Palmetto Bay, FL 33157. English speaking family support group meets the first Monday of each month from 7:00 PM to 8:30 PM in the cafeteria area. Enter through the main entrance and ring the bell to be admitted.
DETAILED DIRECTIONS: Fellowship House’s Palmetto Bay location is off of US 1 between SW 168th St and 184 St. If heading south on US 1, after Guava St, make a left at the light on East Hibiscus St for a 1/2 block and then a left into the parking lot; if heading north on US 1, after Indigo St, make a left at the light on E. Hibiscus St for a 1/2 block and then a right into the parking lot. FH is situated in a small strip shopping center, whose largest tenant is the post office.
For more information, please call Steve H. at 305-773-5328, or contact Lew Gramer at 305-562-1735 or namiofmiami@gmail.com.
HOMESTEAD HOSPITAL – 975 Baptist Way, Homestead, FL 33033. English speaking family support group meets the second Thursday of each month from
7:00 PM to 8:30 PM in the conference room off the main lobby.There is never a charge for attending a support group or any other NAMI of Miami service.
DETAILED DIRECTIONS: Take Florida’s Turnpike to Exit 2 – Campbell Drive. Turn right (east) onto Campbell Dr. Hospital main entrance is less than a mile on your left. Park in main parking, enter though the main lobby.
 For more information, please contact Lew at 305-562-1735 or
South Broward: GEO CARE/SFSH. NAMI support group meets the 3rd Saturday of each month from 10 A.M. to noon in the Mental Health Resource Center in the Administration Building. The hospital is located at 800 E. Cypress Dr., Pembroke Pines, 33025.
NAMI Miami Conexion Spanish Group: 299 Alhambra Circle, Coral Gables, FL 33134 in the conference room the second Wednesday of each month from 7:30 to 9:00 PM.
Led by Beatriz Mendoza and Jorge Arenas for more information contact Jorge at(305)960-7596
NAMI Miami plans a new Conexion Spanish group in the downtown Miami area this Spring. For more information, please contact Jorge at (305) 960-7596 or Nora at (786)308-9680.
(Espanol: En la habitación más al norte: Por mas información, llama a Jorge al (305) 960-7596 o Nora al (786) 308-9680 )
Please visit our website for more information on other family support group location and dates as well as consumer support groups. www.namiofmiami.org
YOU ARE NOT ALONE
NAMI MIAMI-DADE COUNTY

OFFICERS & DIRECTORS

PRESIDENT: Robin Cole: State Substance Abuse and Mental Health Planning Council Committee Chair -“Seeking to Better this Community by Striving to be the Change I Wish to see in the World”
 
VICE-PRESIDENT: Denise Berriz – “Philanthropy is my Mission, Mental Health Reform is my Passion, and People are my Reason”
 
TREASURER: William ( Ted ) Franklin – Board Director South Florida Behavioral Health Network Inc.
 
SECRETARY: Carlos Larrauri , R.N.
 
 
 
BOARD DIRECTOR & MEMBER AT LARGE: Simone Anderson – Miami-Dade County Public Schools, School Health Medical Advisory Committee (SHMAC),  CIT Crisis Intervention Training Instructor Miami-Dade County Department of Corrections & Rehabilitation, Board Director & Vice- President of Public Relations Toastmasters International, MHFA
 
BOARD DIRECTOR & MEMBER AT LARGE: Jorge Arenas, MS
 
 
BOARD DIRECTOR: Lewis J. Gramer Ph.D.
 
BOARD DIRECTOR: Susan Racher – Board Director South Florida Behavioral Health Network Inc., Co-Chair University of Miami Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Science, Miami-Dade County Public Schools Treasury Advisory Board, Vice-President and CFO Wallace Coulter Foundation
 
BOARD DIRECTOR: Shawn Khosravi – Vice-Chair Vizcaya Museum and Gardens Trust, Professor of Business Florida International University, President Bankers Companies LLC
 
BOARD DIRECTOR: J.C. Garrido – Board Director The Key Clubhouse of South Florida, Miami-Dade County Board of County Commissioners Xavier L. Suarez, District 7
BOARD DIRECTOR: David Vittoria – MSW, MCAP, CPP, ICADC, NCAC II Assistant Vice-President Addiction Treatment & Recovery Center Baptist Health South Florida, Board Director South Florida Behavioral Health Network Inc., Board Director Addiction Services Miami-Dade County, Board Director Miami -Dade County Criminal Justice Committee
BOARD DIRECTOR: Anna Shustack, MSW
BOARD DIRECTOR: Kathy Coppola, Esq.
BOARD DIRECTOR: Maria Rivero – Miami-Dade County, Finance Department
Officers and Directors may be Contacted through the NAMI Office at (305) 665-2540 or email namiofmiami@gmail.com

 NAMI Miami-Dade County Newsletter Editor : Simone Anderson

Simone Anderson Editor

 

NAMI of MIAMI NEWS
JANUARY 2016
VOL. 39 Issue 10

Miami-Dade Judge Steven Leifman receives William H. Rehnquist Award for Judicial Excellance Highest Honor of U.S. Supreme Court
Judge Steven Leifman of Miami-Dade County 11th Judicial Circuit Mental Health Courts received The United States Supreme Court Highest Honor in recognition of his contributions to Mental Health Reform.
In This Issue
NAMI OF MIAMI COMMUNITY OUTREACH AND IMPLEMENTATION

NAMI President Robin Cole with Patrick J. Kennedy

Patrick J. Kennedy
  Patrick J. Kennedy
“A Common Struggle”
    Books & Books
      Coral Gables
NAMI of Miami President Robin Cole attended Patrick J. Kennedy, the former congressman and youngest child of Senator Ted Kennedy’s presentation and Book Signing, detailing his personal and political battle with mental illness and addiction. This account explored mental health care’s history in the country alongside his and every family’s private struggles. The Honorable Patrick J. Kennedy is a former member of the U.S. House of Representatives and the nation’s leading political voice on mental illness, addiction, and other brain diseases. During his 16-year career representing Rhode Island in Congress, he fought a national battle to end medical and societal discrimination against these illnesses. The son of Senator Edward Kennedy, he decided to leave Congress not long after his father’s death to devote his career to advocacy for brain diseases. He is the founder of the Kennedy Forum, which unites the community of mental health, and co-founded One Mind for Research, which sponsors brain research and open science collaboration.

 

NAMI Invited toThe Mental Health and Substance Abuse Policy Summit
Senator Rene Garcia of The Florida State Senate 38th District hosted “The Mental Health Forum and Substance Abuse Policy Summit” at Camillus House of Miami. Discussion included Policy Proposals and Funding Components that will improve the Mental Health and Substance Abuse outlook in Florida. The review and Roundtable on Mental Health Reform included issues relating to Care Coordination, The Baker/Marchman Act as well as Funding. Remarks were made from invited experts Judge Steven Leifman, County Judge of the 11th Circuit Mental Health Courts and Substance Abuse and Criminal Justice System. John Bryant, Assistant Secretary for Mental Health and Substance Abuse.The Department of Children and Families and representatives from The Florida Council of Community Mental Health and representatives from the Florida Alcohol and Drug Abuse Association. This Forum took place November 2015.
Nami of Miami Board of Directors participating in this Forum were President Robin Cole, Vice – President Denise Berriz, Board Director Anna Shustack and Board Director Simone Anderson.
Mental Health Policy Summit Round Table

 

 

 

 

NAMI Board Members Simone Anderson & Jorge Arenas
Veterans Administration Caregivers Day

 

On November 4th, 2015 The Veterans Hospital in Miami held the Annual VA Care Givers Day. This day is devoted to the appreciation and recognition of Veteran Caregiver Organizations and Family Members in our community that focus their efforts on helping those who have served in our Armed Forces.

 

Activities included Veterans Administration Staff Presentations as well as “Guest Speaker” Military Veteran Derek Graner touching on points within his own personal account and battle living life as a Military Expert and then making the transition back into civilian life. Caregivers Day allowed for the teaching of techniques on coping, skills for relaxation, and the importance of exercise. Open topics of discussion were raised in addressing concerns of family members and loved ones who may have a loved one at home who needs care. Caregiver Day also included pertinent care information and resources for those fulfilling the role as a Veteran Care Giver.

 

Nami of Miami members of The Board of Directors were on hand to present and share information on and for the members of the Veteran Community.

NAMI of MIAMI JANUARY 2016 GENERAL MEETING

The next NAMI of Miami General Meeting will be held on January 25th, 2016 @ 7:00pm at The Coconut Grove Sailing Club – 2nd Floor 2990 South Bayshore Drive Miami, Fl

 

Presenting Speakers will include: Steven E. Chavoustie, MD, FACOG, CCRP

                                                      & Rishi Kakar MD

NAMI OF MIAMI SOCIAL EVENTS & FUN

NAMI President Robin Cole & Husband David Cole at NAMI Walk 2015
Nami of Miami partnered with NAMI Broward County on the NAMI 2015 Mental Health Walk in order to raise awareness, help change perceptions about mental illness, and to provide important funding that supports our free community programming. NAMI Walk took place November 14, 2015 at Tradewinds Park in Coconut Creek, Florida.
NAMI of Miami Walkers Team 2015

Nami also held “A Holiday Picnic” at Tropical Park in Miami. This was a day of music , fun, games and fellowship as we celebrated the upcoming Christmas Holiday Season. As 2016 begins expect more upcoming social fun events on our new calendar year.

The Key ClubHouse of Miami Joined in Our NAMI Walk
NAMI of Miami “Holiday Picnic” at Tropical Park
NAMI OF MIAMI MENTAL HEALTH NEWS

By Dr. Charles Nemeroff

Dr. Charles Nemeroff

Specialist to Miami Herald

Depression is a commonly used and terribly misunderstood term. When mental health professionals refer to depression, they are referring to a syndrome-a constellation of symptoms that persists every day for two weeks or longer. Patients may feel blue, hopeless and “down in the dumps.” They also may complain of fatigue, sleep disturbances, changes in appetite and decreased concentration.
Think about the saddest you’ve ever felt and feeling like that every day for no obvious reason – this is a good description of major depression.
In the past two decades, we have learned much about the causes of depression. We now know from brain imaging studies that depression, like Parkinson’s disease and stroke, is a brain disease. In addition, depression can run in families.
Depression can be effectively treated by antidepressant medications – such as Prozac, Effexor, Zoloft, Lexapro and others -and/or certain forms of psychotherapy (cognitive-behavior therapy and others).
Patients who fail to respond to one antidepressant often respond to another. Those who do not respond to antidepressants or psychotherapy treatments can receive other approved and effective treatments, including repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) or electroconvulsive therapy (ECT).
The good news is that the vast majority of patients can be effectively treated; the bad news is that many patients remain underdiagnosed and untreated or are reluctant to seek treatment from mental health professionals. When it comes to mental health, patients should always seek out mental health experts – just as they would for any illness.

Dissociative Disorders
 
 
The essential feature of the Dissociative Disorders is a disruption in the usually integrated functions of consciousness, memory, identity, or perception of the environment.
 
The disturbance may be sudden or gradual, transient or chronic. The following disorders are included in this section:
– Dissociative Identity Disorder, previously referred to as Multiple Personality Disorder (MPD) is characterized by the presence of two or more distinct identities or personality states that recurrently take control of the individual’s behavior accompanied by an inability to recall important personal information that is too extensive to be explained by ordinary forgetfulness.
 
– Dissociative Amnesia is characterized by an inability to recall important personal information, usually of a traumatic or stressful nature, that is too extensive to be explained by ordinary forgetfulness.
 
– Dissociative Fugue is characterized by sudden, or unexpected travel away from home or one’s customary place of work, accompanied by an inability to recall one’s past and confusion about personal identity or the assumption of a new identity.
 
– Depersonalization Disorder is characterized persistent or recurrent feelings of detachment from oneself, such as feeling one is in a dream. However, the person experiencing these feelings remains reality-oriented during the occurrence. The possibility of other mental disorders, substance abuse or a general medical condition must be ruled out. The disorder must also cause significant distress or impairment in areas of functioning, such as work or family life.
 
Source: APA, Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorder, Fourth Edition, Washington, D.C. APA 1994

 

{Brain and Behavior Research Foundation}                                       

 

 

NAMI OF MIAMI LETTER TO THE EDITOR OPINION PAGE

 

Practicing the Presence                                                

 

I am happy to share this experience. The presence of God is so important to me. It brings me peace and access to the realm where everything is calm. This space has a sense of emptiness to me , empty of disturbing voices and over loaded stimuli.

 

The way I come to tapping in is by wanting to achieve or enter into this “nothingness”. Here nothing has to make sense as is our regular thinking. This is why I like doing this so much.

 

In a peaceful comfortable place of stillness I am able to enjoy this nothingness. In a rapid information world, being alone with God is like taking a vacation. From this connected place Gods love flows unconditionally. I feel his intimate love and I am given direction for the day. The more I do this the healthier I feel. It is like a cleansing, a personal deep way to recovery from emotional disturbance. I often remember Jesus often went away by himself to reach a clear connection with the Father.

 

By Lucrecia Beranski

En Espanol
Enfermedades mentales, un tema tabú entre los hispanos
Es algo de lo que se habla en voz baja para que los demás no escuchen, que se revela solo a los mas allegados y solo a los que crees que van a entender tu situación porque han vivido algo similar en sus familias. Las enfermedades mentales son un tema tabú en la comunidad hispanoparlante.
Lo más complicado de combatir este tabú es que nadie quiere admitir que tiene una enfermedad mental debido al estigma que conllevan. Las citas con el siquiatra se convierten en secretos bien guardados, incluso hacer una cita con un sicólogo es visto como un gesto de debilidad y las personas les tienen miedo a los pocos que se atreven a hablar del tema, como si fuera algo contagioso.
Infortunadamente, los medios en español perpetúan los estereotipos de las enfermedades mentales. Al final de casi todas las telenovelas, la antagonista es muchas veces una loca demente enferma de celos que hace una matanza final (Corazon valiente de Telemundo), cuando en la realidad las personas con enfermedades mentales suelen ser mas víctimas que victimarios de los violentos.
La comunidad hispana necesita desesperadamente un famoso o famosa que hable español y se decida a enfrentar el tema, que diga por ejemplo “yo tengo una enfermedad mental y soy ejemplo de recuperación”. Alguien que ayude a cambiar el estereotipo y que abogue por que los programas de televisión hagan retratos reales de las enfermedades mentales. Espero que no pase mucho tiempo y que los latinos sigan el ejemplo de estrellas como Demi Lovato o Catherine Zeta Jones.
Written By NAMI Contributer:
Beatriz E. Mendoza Cortissoz
Writer – Journalist
www.ParaMatarElTiempo.com
Follow me as @butis73
NAMI of MIAMI PARTNERS IN OUR COMMUNITY

Banyan Health is a NAMI Partner. It is a South Florida Behavioral Health Provider and one of the largest integrated mental health systems in South Florida. Banyan mental health programs reflect a deeply-rooted commitment to transforming lives in a therapeutic approach to treatment that motivates change. For nearly three and a half decades, we have been helping consumers with emotional and mental health disorders to regain control and purpose in their lives.
Banyan believes in building upon the strengths of their consumers, helping to reinforce relationships with family and friends and restore grace and dignity to life in a recovery model of treatment that emphasizes the uniquely individual nature of recovery as a personal journey.
Their approach to services is consumer-centered, and we provide caring, evidence-based, individualized treatment in supportive clinical, home, and community settings throughout Miami Dade and Broward counties. Their highly qualified Psychiatrists and Mental Health Counselors are culturally and linguistically diverse, and all professional and support staff are bilingual in Spanish and English in all programs and services, with support and referrals for all languages commonly spoken in South Florida.
Banyan’s founders, Miami Behavioral Health Center and Spectrum Programs, are leading regional providers of treatment for co-occurring mental health and addiction disorders, and in the integration of primary healthcare services into the behavioral health treatment standard.
One in four adults in the United States suffers mental health disorders every year, as do one in fivechildren between the ages of five and seventeen. This means that over 70 million Americans annually, in varying degrees of complexity, face a condition that can dominate their lives and their fates. It affects their careers, school performance, quality of life, and even life expectancy, and influences the lives of family members, friends, colleagues, and religious and social acquaintances.
At Banyan, they have nearly four decades of history in the provision of effective mental health services for consumers of all ages in South Florida, with individual, group, and family counseling and supportive services for problems that include:
  • Addiction / Co-occurrence Disorders
  • ADHD / Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
  • Anxiety / Depression
  • Assessment
  • Behavioral Disorders
  • Bipolar Disorder
  • Case Management
  • Depression
  • Domestic Violence
  • Emotional Health
  • Grief and Loss
  • Interpersonal Relationships
  • Parenting
  • PTSD / Post Traumatic Stress Syndrome
  • Psychiatric Evaluations
  • Psychiatric Day Treatment
  • Schizophrenia
  • Self-Esteem
  • Stress
  • Trauma and Abuse
Banyan services are consumer-centered and evidence-based. We work to build a foundation in hope, supportive relationships, a sense of personal empowerment, social inclusion, coping skills, and meaning in life.
VOLUNTEER

BECOME A NAMI OF MIAMI VOLUNTEER
NAMI of Miami appreciates the hard work and commitment from everybody who donates their time to help us continue our effort in helping those effected by mental illnesses.  Please consider joining our organization as a volunteer. There are several different ways you may contribute.
 
New volunteers are required to attend a Volunteer Orientation.
 
To contact us about your interest in volunteering and find out more about our next scheduled orientation please e-mail us at: namiofmiami@gmail.com
NAMI OF MIAMI EDUCATION & SUPPORT PROGRAMS

NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY PROGRAM
What is NAMI‘s Family-to-Family Program?
NAMI Family-to-Family is a free, 12-session educational program for family, significant others and friends of people living with mental illness.
It is a designated evidenced-based program. Research shows that the program significantly improves the coping and problem-solving abilities of the people closest to an individual living with a mental health condition.
  • NAMI Family-to-Family is taught by NAMI-trained family members who have been there, and includes presentations, discussion and interactive exercises.
  • All instruction and course materials are free to class participants
  • Over 300,000 family members have graduated nationwide.
In the greater Miami-Dade area, please call Lew Gramer at 305-562-1735 or emailnamiofmiami@gmail.com.
NAMI PEER -TO- PEER PROGRAM
Peer-to-Peer is a unique, experiential learning program for people with any serious mental illness who are interested in establishing and maintaining their wellness and recovery.


The course was written by Kathryn Cohan McNulty, a person with a psychiatric disability who is also a former provider and manager in the mental health field and a longtime mutual support group member and facilitator.


An advisory board comprised of NAMI consumer members, in consultation with Joyce Burland, Ph.D., author of the successful NAMI Family-to-Family Education program, helped guide the curriculum’s development.


Since 2005, NAMI‘s Peer-to-Peer Recovery Program has been supported by AstraZeneca.
What does the course include?


Peer-to-Peer consists of ten two-hour units and is taught by a team of two trained “Mentors” and a volunteer support person who are personally experienced at living well with mental illness.


Mentors are trained in an intensive three day training session and are supplied with teaching manuals.
For general inquiries, please contact our Education Cordinator Lew Gramer, 305-5621735or Jorge Arenas 305-960-7596, peer teacher.
CONSUMER SUPPORT GROUP
Kendall: NAMI Consumer support group meetings are held on the first and third Tuesdays of the month at 7:30 PM at Kendall Presbyterian Church, 8485 S.W. 112th Street, in the second trailer. Support groups are open to all adults with a mental illness regardless of diagnosis. For more information call Judy Scheel 305-378-2532.
FAMILY SUPPORT GROUPS
Note: There is never a charge for attending a support group or any other NAMI of Miami service. All Groups are open to families of those affected by mental illness Our education coordinator, Lew Gramer at 305-562-1735 will gladly answer your questions.
Kendall: BAPTIST HOSPITAL MEDICAL ARTS BUILDING – West Tower:  8950 North Kendall Drive, first floor. English speaking family support group meets the fourth Thursday of each month from 7:00 PM to 8:30 PM in Suite 105 behind the brass staircase on the first floor. Park in the front parking lot.  Enter through the main entrance make an immediate right to Suite 105.
For more information, please contact NAMI of Miami at 305-665-2540 ornamiofmiami@gmail.com, or call Lew Gramer at 305-562-1735.The Family Support Group meets in Spanish on the second Monday of the month.
En Español
Grupo de apoyo para familias de aquellos que padecen un trastorno mental
El segundo lunes del mes de 7 PM a 8:30 PM en el BAPTIST HOSPITAL MEDICAL ARTSBUILDING – West Tower:  8950 North Kendall Drive, primer piso, sala numero 105.  Entrando por la puerta principal el 105 queda a mano derecha.
Palmetto Bay (new!): FELLOWSHIP HOUSE (Palmetto Bay location) – 9827 E. Hibiscus St., Palmetto Bay, FL 33157. English speaking family support group meets the first Monday of each month from 7:00 PM to 8:30 PM in the cafeteria area. Enter through the main entrance and ring the bell to be admitted.
DETAILED DIRECTIONS: Fellowship House’s Palmetto Bay location is off of US 1 between SW 168th St and 184 St. If heading south on US 1, after Guava St, make a left at the light on East Hibiscus St for a 1/2 block and then a left into the parking lot; if heading north on US 1, after Indigo St, make a left at the light on E. Hibiscus St for a 1/2 block and then a right into the parking lot. FH is situated in a small strip shopping center, whose largest tenant is the post office.
For more information, please call Steve H. at 305-773-5328, or contact Lew Gramer at305-562-1735 or namiofmiami@gmail.com.
HOMESTEAD HOSPITAL – 975 Baptist Way, Homestead, FL 33033. English speaking family support group meets the second Thursday of each month from
7:00 PM to 8:30 PM in the conference room off the main lobby.There is never a charge for attending a support group or any other NAMI of Miami service.
DETAILED DIRECTIONS: Take Florida’s Turnpike to Exit 2 – Campbell Drive. Turn right (east) onto Campbell Dr. Hospital main entrance is less than a mile on your left. Park in main parking, enter though the main lobby.
 For more information, please contact Lew at 305-562-1735 or
South Broward: GEO CARE/SFS

                     

Vol 38, Issue 9             NAMI OF MIAMI NEWS                  September 2015

NAMI of MIAMI on the web – http://www.namiofmiami.org

 THE NEXT GENERAL MEETING WILL BE MONDAY SEPTEMBER 21st, 2015 7:00 P.M.

     COCONUTGROVE SAILING CLUB -2ND FLOOR

     2990 SOUTH BAYSHORE DRIVE, MIAMI

 NAMI NEWSLETTER IS GOING ELECTRONIC

Nami Miami Members, as you may know our Nami Newsletter has gone through many changes over the past months. These changes are in attempt to create the best quality Electronic Newsletter, which will be distributed in the upcoming year. This September letter will be the final mailed version so we hope you find it informative and that it serves you well. We are greatly anticipating updating and sending out our News Blast.

 KEEPING EMOTIONALLY BALANCED

By Lecrecia Beranski

I am just learning what it means to be “centered.” In the psych-spiritual realm meditation is big on this concept. Actually what I have learned is that within us there is a sacred space a God place where there is peace and comfort. If we listen in the quiet we receive a gentle voice that brings us back from a hectic world that pulls us into anxiety and negative thoughts. If we do not go inside for this so sought after refreshment and restoration our lives become unmanageable even so to the extent that we can’t go on. This is a very good coping strategy as it leads us to the God within and he can be there unconditionally. When we feel negative emotion we need not let them fester, rather we need to find a positive one, look for the good and connect to nature, beauty, art and music. Life is beautiful when we approach it this way because we never stop learning and growing.

MENTAL HEALTH AWARENESS WEEK

Mental Illness Awareness Week occurs during the first full week of October. This year it takes place between October 4 – 10. The theme revolves around building a movement through the new StigmaFree initiative. Being Stigma Free means learning, educating and sharing with others on mental illness, focusing on connecting with people to seeing each other as individuals and not a diagnosis, and most importantly, taking action on mental health issues and taking the StigmaFree pledge. – See more at: http://www.nami.org/miaw#sthash.zEmQBN5D.dpuf

ANXIETY DISORDERS

Anxiety disorders can become so severe that normal life and relationships become impaired. There are many types of anxiety disorders with their own unique sets of symptoms. Some of these disorders include panic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), social phobia (or social anxiety disorder), specific phobias, and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD).

Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) is an exaggerated anxiety and tension that persists for months on end and affects approximately 6.8 million Americans. GAD causes people to anticipate catastrophe and worry excessively about many things, from overarching concerns such as health, money or work to more routine concerns such as car repairs or appointments. Worries can be accompanied by physical symptoms, such as fatigue, headaches, muscle tension and aches, difficulty swallowing, trembling, twitching, irritability, sweating, and hot flashes. The disorder usually develops gradually and may begin anytime during life, although the risk is highest between childhood and middle age.

How are anxiety disorders diagnosed?
Primary care physicians and psychiatrists diagnose someone as having an anxiety disorder if symptoms occur for six months on more days than not, and significantly interfere with the person’s ability to function at home, work or school.

Doctors perform physical and psychological evaluations to rule out other causes for the symptoms of anxiety. Cardiovascular disease, thyroid problems, menopause, substance abuse and/or drug side effects, such as from steroids, may cause symptoms similar to those of an anxiety disorder.

{Brain and Behavior Research Foundation}

WHEN YOUR FRIENDS DON’T UNDERSTAND YOUR MENTAL HEALTH CONDITION

By: Stan Popovich

You are just diagnosed with a mental health condition such as depression, bipolar disorder, panic disorder, addiction, OCD, or some other mental health disorder. You go see a counselor to get help. Eventually your relatives and closest friends find out your condition. The problem is that some of them get on your case and do not understand what you are going through. Here are four ways to deal with this situation.

  1. Listen To The Professionals And Not Your Friends–Your friends may mean well, but when it comes down to it, the professionals know your situation more than anyone. They know what you are going through and are trained to deal with your situation. Your friends do not have the answers to your medical condition. When you have questions about your mental health situation consult with your counselor or other mental health professional. Listen to them and follow their advice and not your friends.
  2. Your Goal Is To Get Better–Your goal is to get better, period. Don’t waste your time arguing with your friends or relatives who are giving you a difficult time. This isn’t a public relations event where you need to get everyone’s approval. This is your life and you’re the one suffering. Your main focus is for you to get better. This is the number one thing.
  3. Tell Your Friends To Learn About Your Condition–Tell your friends and relatives that the best way for them to help you is to learn about your condition. They could talk to a counselor, they could do family therapy, they could read some good books or join you at a support group to learn about your condition. They won’t know exactly the pain your suffering but they will have some idea of what you are going through. If some of your friends won’t do this, then stay away from them. They will only make things worse.
  4. Distance Yourself From People Who Give You A Hard Time–This may seem cruel but if some of your friends or relatives are hindering your progress in getting better, then kindly tell them to follow step Three or else tell them to stay away and go bother someone else. Distance yourself from those people who won’t make an effort to help understand what you are going through. You need to surround yourself with positive and supportive people. Again, if you have problems or issues with a particular person, you can always ask your counselor for advice on how to deal with them.

Take advantage of the help that is available around you. If possible, talk to a professional who can help you manage your depression and anxieties. They will be able to provide you with additional advice and insights on how to deal with your current problem. By talking to a professional, a person will be helping themselves in the long run because they will become better able to deal with their problems in the future.

BIOGRAPHY:

Stan Popovich is the author of “A Layman’s Guide to Managing Fear Using Psychology, Christianity and Non Resistant Methods”. Stan’s managing fear book has become very popular with over 300 positive book reviews and counting. Please read the many book reviews of Stan’s popular book by going to Stan’s website at http://www.managingfear.com/

PEER TO PEER SUPPORT OPPORTUNITIES & FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP FACILITATORS

There are many outlets available within NAMI for Support. Nami offers Peer to Peer Support Groups which are groups for those who have been diagnosed with a mental illness. These groups meets regularly and offer the opportunity to become further involved as a Mentor or as a Peer to Peer Support Leader. Our Family to Family opportunities are vast as well, where families can come together for support. NAMI has recently graduated 11 new Family Members within the NAMI F2F Facilitator Training Program, which is offered to Family Members of those who have been diagnosed with a mental illness.

Please go to namiofmiami.org to find a Group or Training that is right for you.

Consumer Support Groups

Kendall: NAMI Consumer support group meetings are held on the first and third Tuesdays of the month at 7:30 PM at Kendall Presbyterian Church, 8485 S.W. 112th Street, in the second trailer. Support groups are open to all adults with a mental illness regardless of diagnosis. For more information call Judy Scheel 305-378-2532.

Downtown: UM-JMH MEDICAL CENTER:THE GROUP IS STARTING UP

AGAIN. Psychoeducational support group for consumers with serious mental illness. Professionally led, including psychiatrist participation. Meets FIRST AND THIRD WEDNESDAY mornings from 10:00Am-11:30AM, room 3310 (3rd floor), Mental Health Building, 1695 NW 9th Avenue (Bob Hope Blvd).The facilitator is Dr. Harriet Lefley. For information, call 305-355-9118. Leave your message and phone number for return call.

Kendall: *NEW KENDALL SPANISH SUPPORT GROUP : Consumer support group in SPANISH will meet the second Monday of the month at 7:30 pm at Kendall Presbyterian Church, 8485 S.W. 112th Street in the second trailer. Support groups are open to all adults with a mental illness, regardless of diagnosis. Please register for the class here:  Registration Required for Kendall Conexion Support Group.  Please contact Carlos at 305 510 9196 or email Carlos Larrauri at:  carlos.larrauri001@mymdc.net or call Jorge at 305-960-7596.

*Un grupo nuevo de apoyo en Español se reunirá el segundo lunes de cada mes a las 7:30 pm en la Iglesia Presbiteriana de Kendall, 8485 SW Calle 112 en el segundo tráiler. Los grupos de apoyo están abiertos a todos los adultos con trastornos mentales, independientemente del diagnóstico. Por favor, póngase en contacto con Carlos Larrauri en (305) 510 9196 o por correo electrónico a:  carlos.larrauri001@mymdc.net o con Jorge al 305-960-7596.

Family Support Groups

Note: There is never a charge for attending a support group or any other NAMI of Miami service. Our education coordinator, Lew Gramer, 305-562-1735 will gladly answer your questions.

See our CALENDAR for further information on many of the programs listed below…

Support groups for families

Kendall: BAPTIST HOSPITAL MEDICAL ARTS BUILDING – West Tower:  8950 North Kendall Drive, first floor. English speaking family support group meets the second Monday and fourth Thursday of each month from 7:00 PM to 8:30 PM in Suite 105 behind the brass staircase on the first floor. Park in the front parking lot.  Enter through the main entrance make an immediate right to Suite 105.  For more information, please contact NAMI of Miami at 305-665-2540 or namiofmiami@gmail.com, or call Lew Gramer at 305-562-1735.

Palmetto Bay (new!): FELLOWSHIP HOUSE (Palmetto Bay location) – 9827 E. Hibiscus St., Palmetto Bay, FL 33157. English speaking family support group meets the first Monday of each month (beginning June 1st, 2015) from 7:00 PM to 8:30 PM in the cafeteria area. Enter through the main entrance and ring the bell to be admitted.  DETAILED DIRECTIONS: Fellowship House’s Palmetto Bay location is off of US 1 between SW 168th St and 184 St. If heading south on US 1, after Guava St, make a left at the light on East

Hibiscus St for a 1/2 block and then a left into the parking lot; if heading north on US 1, after Indigo St, make a left at the light on E. Hibiscus St for a 1/2 block and then a right into the parking lot. FH is situated in a small strip shopping center, whose largest tenant is the post office. For more information, please call Steve H. at 305-773-5328, or contact Lew Gramer at 305-562-1735 or namiofmiami@gmail.com.

Homestead (new!): HOMESTEAD HOSPITAL – 975 Baptist Way, Homestead, FL 33033. English speaking family support group meets the second Thursday of each month (beginning July 9th, 2015) from 7:00 PM to 8:30 PM in the conference rooms off the main lobby. DETAILED DIRECTIONS: Take Florida’s Turnpike to Exit 2 – Campbell Drive. Turn right (east) onto Campbell Dr. Hospital main entrance is less than a mile on your left. Park in main parking, enter though the main lobby. For more information, please contact Lew at 305-562-1735 or namiofmiami@gmail.com.

South Broward: GEO CARE/SFSH. NAMI support group meets the 3rd Saturday of each month from 10 A.M. to noon in the Mental Health Resource Center in the Administration Building. The hospital is located at 800 E. Cypress Dr., Pembroke Pines, 33025.

NAMI SEPTEMBER GENERAL MEETING SPEAKER LAURA ROJAS

 

Laura Rojas is a Miami native. She attended University of Michigan, Ann Arbor for her undergraduate degrees, where she received a BA in psychology and a BDA in Dance. Following her undergraduate work, she remained in the Detroit area where she was a case manager for foster children. After three years in the field as a social worker, she attended law school at Loyola University Chicago where she received a ChildLaw Fellowship to specialize in representing children.

 

Laura began her legal career at the Office of the Public Defender in Miami, Florida where she remained for almost ten years. After her initial rotations through County, Juvenile, and Felonies she moved into a position with the Juvenile Sentencing Alternatives Project (JSAP) representing juveniles direct filed into the adult court and seeking juvenile sanctions for them.

 

Laura eventually moved into the Felony Mental Health Unit at the Office of the Public Defender and represented individuals who were adjudicated either incompetent to proceed or not guilty by reason of insanity. She remained in this position for just over four years, representing clients in a variety of proceedings including competency hearings, placement hearings, dismissal hearings, involuntary medication hearings and Baker Act hearings.

 

Laura also has extensive experience preparing mitigation materials and presentations that result in alternative sentences. Laura opened up her own practice in January 2014. Her practice, Laura Rojas, P.A., is now based in Coral Gables, Florida.

NAMI OF MIAMI OFFICERS & DIRECTORS Officers

President: Robin Cole – “Seeking to better this community by striving to be the change I wish to see in the world”

Vice-president: Denise Berriz – “Philanthropy is my mission, mental health reform is my passion, and people are my reason.”

Treasurer:   William (Ted) Franklin

Secretary:  Carlos Larrauri

Members at Large: Simone Anderson, Jorge Arenas

Lewis J. Gramer

Susan Racher

Officers and directors may be contacted through the NAMI office at 305-665-2540 or email namiofmiami@gmail.com

 NAMI JUNENEWSLETTER pdf

 

Vol 35, Issue 7                     NAMI OF MIAMI NEWS                   March  2015 

NAMI OF MIAMI-PO Box 430230, SOUTH MIAMI, FL 33243

(305) 665-2540  Fax (305) 665-2540

 Email: namiofmiami@gmail.com  

THE NEXT GENERAL MEETING WILL BE MONDAY ON APRIL 2OTH, 2015 at 7:00 P.M.

 COCONUTGROVE SAILING CLUB -2ND FLOOR

 2990 SOUTH BAYSHORE DRIVE, MIAMI 

 

MS. HASBI W. KABA TO SPEAK TO NAMI

Habsi W. Kaba has over 20 years of experience in the field of mental health and 10 years in public safety.  Ms. Kaba has a Masters in Marriage and Family Therapy with a background in psychosocial rehabilitation and recovery.  As the Miami-Dade County’s Crisis Intervention Team Coordinator, Ms. Kaba conducts crisis intervention training for all law enforcement agencies, local and federal Hostage/Crisis Negotiators, U.S Marshalls, School Resource Officers, Police Academy Trainees, 911 Emergency Communications personnel. In addition, she serves as the behavioral health and criminal justice system’s liaison.  Ms. Kaba develops needs-specific curriculums and implementation of programs and has partnered with The U.S. Department of Homeland Security, The Department of Veteran’s Affairs, The Department of Corrections & Rehabilitation, state-wide judiciary and court employees, hospital emergency room staff, psychiatric crisis stabilization unit staff, social service institutions, Miami-Dade College security and security companies in the private sector.  Ms. Kaba is internationally recognized as an expert in the field of mental health, crisis intervention and de-escalation techniques.  Ms. Kaba’s educational platform extends to communities throughout local and national radio and televised productions such as CNN.  To date Ms. Kaba has trained more than 7000 professionals and continues to provide training, education and consulting services throughout the United States and Canada.

NEWLY ELECTED BOARD OF DIRECTORS    

Elections for the Board of Directors took place at the NAMI of Miami Annual meeting January 26th, 2015. Nami Miami welcomes and congratulates  the following new elected officials to the Board of Directors:

                                Robin Cole – President

                           Denise Berriz- Vice President

                              Donna Shepard -Officer

HONORING WITH GRATITUDE RETIRING BOARD MEMBERS SERVICE 

Retiring President Judith Robinson chose to always address the importance of family education in understanding comprehensive medical care of chronic mental illness patients. She herself has been a strong force in the Mental Health Community and a guardian, advocate and caregiver to the mentally ill for several decades. We recognize her contribution and honor her service to NAMI.

In addition Nami of Miami recognizes long time Board Member Duane O’Hare who’s core service and contribution to the Board has been dependably remarkable. We thank Judith and Duane for their service.

NAMI MIAMI EDUCATION PROGRAMS

Family-to-Family is a class taught for family members of those dealing with a mental illness, by their fellow family members who have been trained to teach it. NAMI Miami now has four newly certified Family-to-Family teachers, in addition to the three previously certified. A course has just completed, but your NAMI Miami will be running this course in English again soon – please contact Lew Gramer at 305-562-1735, email:  lew.gramer@gmail.com for details.

De Familia a Familia (the same class in Spanish) will be offered Saturdays 10am-4pm at the Kendall Presbyterian Church. For more information, please contact Carlos Fernandez 305-281-9164, email: habanero1947@att.net.

El curso de Nami “De Familia a Familia”, en Español sera dictado, Sabados 10AM a 4PM en Kendall Presbiterian Church, 8485 SW 112Th St, Miami, FL 33156. Para mayor información favor contactar a Carlos Fernandez al 305-721 9698, email habanero1947@att.net.

To see what these Family-oriented classes are all about, and how they can help you and your family member, see the NAMI National Web site at:

http://www.nami.org/Find-Support/NAMI-Programs/NAMI-Family-to-Family

STOP THE STIGMA MENTAL HEALTH SUMMIT

NAMI ‘s Mental Health Summit will be held on May 2nd, 2015, 8:00am- 4:30 pm  at UHealth Conference Center 1400 NW 12th Ave., Miami, Florida. This will be a Mental Health Conference providing essential information about diagnosis, intervention, research and best practices to optimize recovery. Free and open to all professionals, families and those living with mental illness. Highlights include: Elyn Saks, legal scholar, Pete Early, journalist and mental health advocate. Dr. Charles Nemeroff , Dr. Phillip Harvey and Dr. Sara Czaja. Continuing education credit will be available. Registration will begin March 2015.

HOW IS SCHIZOPHRENIA DIAGNOSED & HOW IS IT TREATED?
A combination of factors can predict schizophrenia in up to 80 percent of youth who are at high risk of developing the illness. These factors include isolating oneself and withdrawing from others, an increase in unusual thoughts and suspicions, and a family history of psychosis. In young people who develop the disease, this stage of the disorder is called the “prodromal” period.

Currently, schizophrenia is diagnosed by the presence of symptoms or their precursors for a period of six months. Two or more symptoms, such as hallucinations, delusions, disorganized speech, and grossly disorganized or catatonic behavior, must be significant and last for at least one month. Only one symptom is required for diagnosis if delusions are bizarre enough or if hallucinations consist either of a voice constantly commenting on the person’s behavior/thoughts, or two or more voices “conversing.” Social or occupational problems can also be part of the diagnosis during the six-month period.

Foundation-funded research to find markers, such as abnormal brain scans or blood chemicals that can help detect early disease and allow for quicker interventions is now being done. Scientists are also working to understand the genetic and environmental mechanisms that combine to cause schizophrenia. As more is discovered about chemical circuitry and structure of the brains of people with the disease, better diagnostic tools and early intervention techniques can be developed. This is crucial for schizophrenia as it is believed that with every psychotic episode, increased damage is done to the brain. [From Brain Behavior Research Foundation Website]

NUTRITION AS IT RELATES TO MENTAL HEALTH

It is crucial to always eat healthy to ensure proper nutrition especially for the mentally ill. The food we eat and its intake effects bodies, minds and mood and can make a significant effect on our over all health. Certain nutrients in a well balanced diet can generate proper nutrition and have a positive effect physically and emotionally. Specifically Omega-3 fatty acids improve heart health and mental health some of these omega acids include acids found in seafood such as salmon, herring, and sardines. This can also be seen in flaxseed and walnuts. In addition many cases of depressed individuals, these people have been found  to not have enough Folic Acid and Vitamin B-12 in their diets. These essential  vitamins are found in leafy greens, fruits as well as fish, meat and diary products. Ultimately for ultimate care and nutrition. Keep up with our diets and intake, exercise and think healthy to be healthy.

By Simone Anderson, Nami Board of Directors/ Newsletter Editor

NAMI HAS A NEW WEBSITE

Nami of Miami has updated their website.

Now when you go to www.namiofmiami.org


You will find all updated information about Nami of Miami and where to go to find help and support. The websites graphics and links easily take you to several resources including: Meetings and Schedules, Programs and Services, Volunteer Sign up, and how to become a Member. Please go to www.namiofmiami.org to find out more.

Meeting with Legislative Delegation is set January 30th at 10:30am-12pm Miami Dade College Wolfson Campus. There will be signs on campus to direct you to the building.

The address is as follows:

Chapman Hall

300 N.E. 2nd Avenue

Room 3210

Building 3

Miami, FL 33132

 

NAMI Miami Newsletter Oct/Nov 2014 (PDF File)

Donors and sponsors

Become a Member

JOIN NAMI

Get Involved

DONATE NOW

Get In Touch

CONTACT US